The business case for diversity, L’Oréal, Nike, Amplify, DirecTV, diversity in finance, groups driving engagement and more

I want to thank those who have added names to the list of Latino sources for media, we are now up to 90. The list is open for anyone who wants to make additions.

We continue to see studies that speak to the business case for diversity. Here is this from Harvard Business Review which finds that “Diversity significantly improves financial performance on measures such as profitable investments at the individual portfolio-company level and overall fund returns.” In addition to the findings, it includes “evidenced-based recommendations.”

Other good reads this week, L’Oréal shared some diversity best practices as a member of the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion, read this from the Company’s CEO. There are many debates on how to fight bias and promote diversity. Here is this from Fast Company. Forbes published this titled  “Seven Ways To Address The Diversity Problem In Finance.” Here is this piece titled “Inside Nike’s purge: More than a #MeToo moment,” and this: “U.S. Bus Tour Promotes Unconscious-Bias Discussion.”

If you try to engage diverse audiences, you know there are many groups and organizations focused on driving engagement. For example, Ben Finzel created a LGBTQ networking group in DC, read more here. Christy Haubegger, who founded Latina Magazine, launched “the most comprehensive site for underrepresented writers” and it is called Amplify, learn more here.   Also, DirecTV and Reese Witherspoon announced a new production deal.

ICYMI here is this great piece by Esmeralda Bermudez where she asked people how language has shaped their world. Having moved to the U.S. when I was ten, I will always be grateful to my mother for ensuring we spoke Spanish. Being bilingual has enriched me personally and opened many doors professionally.

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

 

How one startup is working to break the barriers that separate talent from opportunity for women

Usually I don’t dedicate a blog post to only one topic but I’ve decided to do more than one post this week and what better way to start than talking about women empowerment. Yesterday I had the privilege of joining Silvina Moschini as she unveiled the collaboration of her social impact startup SheWorks! with EY. It was a very proud moment as I’ve had a first row seat watching someone who understands and believes in the work she is doing to use technology to make an impact – as she says “breaking the barriers that separate talent from opportunity.”  Her vision, passion and commitment, coupled with the technology, are why she has been able to attract top tech companies and brands, as well as small enterprises who are being powered by SheWorks! talent. I am fortunate to be a part of the team helping to ensure that more women can pursue their professional aspirations on their own terms.

Some stats to keep in mind:

  • Every year, millions of highly qualified women opt-out of the job market due to inflexible work environments. Approximately 50% of American women with children quit their jobs due to lack of options to maintain a satisfactory work/life balance.
  • Closing the employment participation gap has the potential to create $4 trillion dollars impact in the U.S. economy alone and a global value of $17 trillion,
  • It will take until 2095 to achieve global gender parity in the workplace.

EY as founding sponsor of SheWorks! is walking the talk – in fact the announcement yesterday included a commitment to use SheWorks! to create opportunities for 100,000 women by 2020. Learn more about the announcement here. Julie Teigland, EY Regional Managing Partner—Germany, Switzerland and Austria and EY Global Leader-elect, Women. Fast forward said, “Every year, millions of professional women leave the workforce because they cannot find the flexibility they need to balance work and life. We’re excited to start this collaboration as we believe that SheWorks! is doing something exceptional in working to ensure that women and girls can increasingly benefit from the use of innovative technologies to join the workforce and they can play a role into the economic development.”

Visit www.wheresheworks.com, follow on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn and follow the conversation using #whereareyouworking #whereareyouworkingtoday #womenfastforward.

Congratulations to the amazing teams at EY and at SheWorks!.

Men as Allies, Tony Robbins and #MeToo, Workforce Diversity Success Tips, Adweek, Variety, First Latina CEO & more

Last week I attended an event in which the importance of men as allies was discussed and then I read this in the Wall Street Journal titled “Men Learn How to Be ‘Allies,’ Without Fear, to Female Colleagues.” It includes research that says that 55% of men in the U.S. said they found it “harder for them to know how to interact with women at work, according to a new Pew Research Center Poll of more than 6,000 adults.”  That is why the example Tony Robbins gave this weekend about his high profile client is so disturbing. Why would Mr. Robbins not stop his client and call him on how wrong not hiring the female candidate was, the more qualified candidate, because she was attractive? He blamed the #MeToo movement. Mr. Robbins has apologized but my bigger question is what is he telling clients now? Maybe as a coach he could help him address his concerns in a way where women are not negatively impacted by HIS issues? He could become an ally. 

We will continue to see the theme of men as allies as an important part of positive change. In this post Melinda Gates  (which talks about much more and is an important read) she says, “Men, this is your invitation to be an ally.” For those interested in learning and doing more, I did find the Forté Men as Allies Initiative. The site includes research and resources and encourages men to create ally groups. You can find information here. Maybe Tony Robbins should look them up….

In other news, The Harvard Business Review recently published two interesting pieces: “5 Things We Learned About Creating a Successful Workplace Diversity Program” and  “How to Use Employee Referrals Without Giving Up Workplace Diversity.” Both include good tips as you continue to work to foster diversity in your organizations. Susan Wojcicki, YouTube CEO, also shared some good tips here for tech companies and Susan Giles wrote about why diversity is essential for innovation. This week CNN profiled Geisha Williams, CEO and President of PG&E Corp, who is the first Latina CEO of a major U.S. company.  

Congratulations to the incredible leaders celebrated in AdWeek’s “11 Inspiring Women Who Have Broken Down Advertising’s Most Persistent Barriers.” Variety also released its 2018 Power of Women New York Impact List. Here is the weekly update on the record breaking Black Panther, this past week it passed “The Titanic.’

ICYMI this by Julio Ricardo Varela titled “The trouble with being the ‘only Latino in the room’’ is another recommended read for the week.

Photo by rawpixel.com on Unsplash

Leading with inclusion, I.D.E.A.S. Summit powered by Forbes, PayScale study, Macy’s new line, congratulations to Policy Wisdom & more

I’ve talked about 2018 being the year of inclusion. This piece in Fast Company focuses on inclusion and provides good recommendations. And in this recent post Glenn Llopis focuses on inclusion and actually speaks of having the D&I role in corporate strategy vs. HR. I agree with Glenn that we need to rethink the approach to diversity and see how this could have a greater impact. I also agree 100% that by rethinking diversity you will drive growth. However, I would argue that HR still plays an important role and key to that is 1) hiring the right people and 2) investing in career development and mapping. Learn from companies like Estée Lauder which is leading with inclusion and by organizations like She Runs It which are creating programs to have a greater impact.

On another topic – recruitment – here is this interesting study from PayScale that says that relying too heavily on referrals can create a less diverse workforce. This speaks to the point of making an effort. Yes referrals may be one way to find the right candidate, but make sure all employees are empowered to provide referrals. However, also look at other ways to attract talent including partnering with the right organizations and going to colleges and universities that serve diverse communities.

There is much work to be done as it relates to diversity across industries and the reports, programs and efforts being launched should start to move the needle. One such program focused on the entertainment industry was recently announced by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and filmmaker Ava DuVernay, read more here

Another recommended read this week is this Digiday piece titled “In the #MeToo era, agency bosses worry diversity hiring will lead to tokenism.”  Read to the end, with some good examples on how to recruit, retain and create a pipeline of women leaders.

Other headlines include Macy’s new line which launched to mixed reviews; Forbes is hosting the inaugural I.D.E.A.S. Summit in May; Microsoft hired a Chief Diversity Officer...and IBM is suing; US Hispanic Chamber of Commerce head stepping down amid “amid allegations of financial impropriety and sexual harassment;” and of course the Olympics.

Congratulations to our friends at Latina-led Policy Wisdom for their eight years of “growth and evolution. Watch this video about their work – very proud of the team including founder @anaritagon

ICYMI, President Barack Obama’s and former First Lady Michelle Obama’s portraits were unveiled at the National Portrait Gallery this week. This by  Renée Grahamthink provides one of the best perspectives.

Photo by Doug Swinson on Unsplash

Black History Month, Super Bowl, #3percentSB, Being Black in PR & more

This month we celebrate Black History Month and if you want to learn more about this celebration visit the History Channel’s site. Many companies focus this month in celebrating the contributions of African Americans both with internal and external audiences but looking at the demographics you would think it should be more than a month.  I do agree that this is a great opportunity to engage and celebrate but be sure you engage with your resource/affinity groups and with leaders who understand the community in building programs that are not just a month-long celebration.

This is also an opportunity to look at the present and future, as well as the impact of the community. From black purchasing power, to the small business impact, to the importance of the black vote as seen in the Alabama election and to the entertainment impact, with the most recent example being  Black Panther. If you missed the red carpet premiere, as this article states, it was a glorious celebration.

Yet when it comes to celebrating diversity, many companies still get it wrong both internally and externally. Look at the RAM Trucks Super Bowl commercial, and yes the estate approved the use of Dr. Martin Luther King’s voice, but it goes back to the question of representation. Did the brand or advertising team have any diversity on the team? Did they have colleagues who felt empowered to flag that there may be an issue? This is why it’s important. Your intent may be good, and I am sure it was, but if you do not understand the audience or the sensitivities, you are not being authentic and will have bigger issues to manage. The negative response on social was swift and reflected overall in the coverage in outlets including the New York Times, ABC and CBS to name a few. This is from AdAge on the brand defending the ad.

Staying on the Super Bowl topic, if you did not follow the 3 Percent Conference Super Bowl Tweetup, you should have. In fact all marketers should do a search using the #3percentSB hashtag, you will find great insights. Participants applied the three percent test to the commercials, which is:
1. Is there a woman?
2. Is she defying stereotypes?
3. Is she the hero?

I did watch each commercial differently this year as I followed the Tweetup. 

This past week PRWeek released this fantastic video on “Being Black in PR.” Watch it. Share it. Use it internally. I could relate to so many of the points made and congratulate Perry Simpson and everyone who worked on it and contributed their voice to a very important resource.

It seems there is a weekly report issued on why diversity matters, here is this one from Harvard Business Review titled “How and Where Diversity Drives Financial Performance.” It includes some great data and, as it says, hopefully motivation for increasing diversity. It found that “the most-diverse enterprises were also the most innovative, as measured by the freshness of their revenue mix.”  And then there is also what seems like a weekly report regarding the lack of diversity in an industry or sector, here is this one titled “Academic Medicine Needs More Women Leaders.”

This week’s ICYMI story is one that hopefully inspires you. Titled “Code Breakers: Computer science has a girl problem and Reshma Saujani MPP 1999 is fixing it,” the piece profiles Reshma Saujani and Girls Who Code, which has taught coding to more than 40,000 girls.

Finally, last week I shared this list of upcoming conferences which will be updated periodically. If there are other events to include or to highlight, please do not hesitate to send my way.  

Photo by LinkedIn Sales Navigator on Unsplash

Two new diversity reports, Women’s March, CEO Action, Apple partners with Malala Fund, Oscars, RENEWPR & more

This week let’s start with two reports that prove (again) that if you want a more innovative and stronger performing company you need diversity.

Here is this report from McKinsey, which expands on the one released in 2015 and which says that, “The business case for diversity continues to be compelling and to have global relevance.”  

FastCompany wrote about this second report titled “Do Pro-Diversity Policies Improve Corporate Innovation?”. The big takeaway is that: “Companies that fulfill all nine positive diversity requirements announce an average of two extra products in any given year, which about doubles the average for a major company (those that tick fewer boxes are less innovative proportionally). Moreover, the researchers find that companies with pro-diversity policies were also more resilient in terms of innovation during the 2008 financial crisis.”

The Sunday shows did not focus much of their time on the Women’s March this year…let’s keep that in mind as you read this headline, How the Women’s March Is Turning Protesters Into Politicians.” 

As you may recall, last year the CEO Action Pledge for Diversity and Inclusion (CEO Action) was announced. Today it has more than 350 member companies representing 85 different industries. The group recently convened C-level executives to discuss their efforts, more information here

On the education front, Apple announced yesterday that it is partnering with the Malala Fund to support education for girls. According to the announcement, the partnership is “designed to enable the nonprofit to double the number of grants it offers and extend its funding programs to India and Latin America.”

Another story that got my attention is this one from the Washington Post titled “These kids started a book club for minority boys. It’s the most popular club in school.”  Finding and having the students’ read books that represent them is driving engagement. This is a great model and hope other schools, libraries and educational institutions take notice.

Congratulations to Ben Finzel and our friends at RENEWPR on their third year anniversary – read more here on how the team is celebrating this milestone.

Let’s close with two of my favorite recent videos:

  • This one in which Ava DuVernay used her speech at the Image Awards to celebrate others, bravo!
  • Then there’s this one, listen to this part and see Ricky Martin’s reaction:  “I seriously went very berserk on Dean Richards because you have to understand, when you’re part of a minority, and you don’t have a lot of role models in media, and you have a Ricky Martin that wherever you go in the world, it’s a good name to mention as a Puerto Rican, oh my goodness you feel related to him.”

Here’s hoping to see much more representation in media and that Ana Belava meets Ricky soon!

Photo by Mohamed Lammah on Unsplash

 

MLK Day of Service, Black Enterprise best companies for diversity, NALEO report, workforce diversity and more

Yesterday we celebrated Martin Luther King Day, a day which has become a national day of service. I was in New York and all the volunteer projects available at New York Cares were taken, which speaks to how for many this is not a day off. Here is some history on how in 1994 Representatives John Lewis and Harris Wofford made this a “day of action, not apathy.”  

This week Black Enterprise released its 2018 50 best companies for diversity. Here’s the list. In addition, here is some very interesting data from a recent BlackEnterprise.com study conducted by XpertHR of human resource professionals:

  • Approximately 25% of respondents said they were “very or extremely challenged by developing a culture of inclusion;”
  • 29% said they had similar difficulties in “recruiting a more diverse workforce” and
  • 33% cited challenges in “increasing minorities in leadership roles.”

Keeping with the workforce diversity theme, Matthew Glotzbach, CEO of Quizlet, published this piece outlining the four ways his team is increasing workforce diversity. This is very focused on recruitment, which is key, but it’s also important to remember that inclusion is critical for retention. Last year The Kapor Center for Social Impact released a report which found that “women, blacks and Latinos are far more likely to quit jobs in tech than white or Asian men.” Read more here.  Talking about diversity in tech, here is this from the San Francisco Chronicle titled “Rwanda is pushing gender diversity in tech. Should Silicon Valley take notes?”

Today the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) Educational Fund released its 2017 National Directory of Latino Elected Officials.  NALEO found that 6,600 Latinos are serving in elected office, up from 6,011 in 2013, an increase of nearly 10 percent.  Here is the release announcing the findings.

These past few months I’ve been impressed with how Google has celebrated the contributions of diverse individuals. This morning was no exception as a number of posts on Twitter alerted me to today’s Google Doodle commemorating Katy Jurado who, as Time Magazine states, was “a groundbreaking Mexican actress who built a Hollywood career without sacrificing her identity” on the day that would have been her 94th birthday.  She once said, “”I didn’t take all the films that were offered — just those with dignity.” Here is this interview of her talking about working with Grace Kelly.  One more Google story, according to Remezcla “Google Just Launched One of the Largest Digital Collections of Latino Art & History.”  Read more here.

Talking about representation, here is this piece in the New York Times titled “Guess Who’s Coming to ‘Peanuts.”  I see this as a great example of the importance of representation and it shows how to do things in a way that drives engagement without alienating other audiences.

Photo by James Motter on Unsplash