Puerto Rico, Hispanic Heritage Month,  Col. Gil Coronado, Sol Trujillo, Fortune’s Most Powerful Women, Marc Pritchard and more

One year after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, here is this from the Takeaway titled “After The Storm: Stories of Puerto Rican Resilience” and CBS aired this special titled “Puerto Rico: The exodus after Hurricane Maria.” Want to help? Support PRxPR.

As many of you may know, Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated between September 15 and October 15 each year.  Watch this to learn more about how this month-long celebration started. Thank you Elaine Coronado for sharing. Here is more info on the celebration. There are numerous events and celebrations and many companies take the opportunity to host internal and/or external events, it is also a good time to spotlight the many contributions of Hispanics to the U.S. This from CNBC talks about the impact of Latino small businesses in the economy and watch Sol Trujillo talk about how Latinos are impacting the economy.  Here is this from Carlos Lozada from 2013 on who is Latino (or today Latinx) that also speaks to the history of the term Hispanic.

Some of the items I’m following this week: Fortune released the list of Most Powerful Women, an inspiring list of leaders, you can read more here. Axios had this article about how this Congress, depending on the election results, could be the more diverse in history and more accurately reflect the country.  Another week and another article about the importance of diversity in business.  Here is this great read titled “Why Confronting Our Unconscious Biases Is Both a Moral and Business Imperative.”

On the arts and entertainment front, the Getty Research Institute is launching an African American Art History initiative and Latinos made the “The Nun” #1 at the box office during its premiere week

ICYMI read this titled “Marc Pritchard shares personal journey around bias and labels.”

Photo by Elias Castillo on Unsplash

Puerto Rico, #WhereAreTheChildren Movement, Starbucks, Roseanne, Female CEOs & more

This past week there have been important stories that should not get lost and are focused on Puerto Rico and immigration. These two stories speak to the important role media, academia and organizations play in ensuring the voices of the voiceless are heard and why diversity is important. 

If you missed this important story, here is CBS’s coverage of the Harvard report. I share this story because David Begnaud at CBS has done an outstanding job of covering Puerto Rico since Hurricane Maria hit, here is more on his coverage. In fact, he will be honored at the Puerto Rican Day Parade because of his work – he also received The Polk award for his coverage. However, it t is important to note that many reporters have been focused on covering Puerto Rico, on the numbers given by the government and asking for updated numbers for some time, including Julio Varela and Latino Rebels as well as Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism.

The other story that broke last week was regarding the administration’s policy on family separation and the more than 1,400 children that are unaccounted for. There are different issues here. 1) unaccompanied minors coming to the U.S., 2) the  family policy unveiled by this administration in early May and 3) there is the issue of the reports of abuse of these kids in custody. Here is this from Yahoo! that explains the different issues. These are important stories that need to continue to be covered and having diverse journalists that understand the issues will be important.

For me one area of frustration is the lack of Latinos on the Sunday talk shows – this is from 2017 but speaks to the issue…and Latinos need to be invited not only to talk about immigration. As you may recall, last week I wrote about the lack of diversity in media, here is a tweet from Astead Herndon, national politics reporter at the New York Times about why diversity is important. I don’t want to ignore when diversity gets an important platform in media. I missed the “Everyday Racism in America” discussion on MSNBC but hope to watch it later this week. Here’s a link.  Note this is a link from twitter which shows more than 950K viewers on the platform, I wonder what the TV ratings will be?

On Tuesday afternoon Starbucks closed its stores for the diversity training. The WSJ focused on how this potentially helped competitors, while other media like USA Today focused on the training itself. Here is this good piece from the Dallas Morning News, where they invited companies recognized for diversity to talk about their D&I efforts. Unfortunately the story dominating the news yesterday was Roseanne being canceled because of a racist tweet. I am not sure anyone was surprised by her tweet. The surprise was the swift action by ABC, Viacom’s channels and Hulu as they canceled and/or pulled the show.

Other stories from this week, Snapchat’s diversity, this titled “What’s Behind the Decline in Female CEOs,” Revlon naming its first woman CEO and Law.com’s Diversity Scorecard.

Congratulations to the amazing Girl Scouts CEO Sylvia Acevedo, she was named one of Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People in Business – and I could not agree more!

Photo by Dmitry Schemelev on Unsplash