Crazy Rich Asians, Kelly Marie Tran, Washington Post, NPR, Marie Claire & More

This weekend I watched “Crazy Rich Asians” and it was such fun. Plus I love that, as many outlets noted, it once again proved the power of diversity. I also love the response by the Asian American community to the film, including this from Jane Mo or this from Kimberly Yam and of course the story about the letter sent to request the song Yellow from Cold Play. Then on Monday I was brought back to reality, about how much work needs to be done, after reading this from Kelly Marie Tran in the New York Times. I applaud her strength but saddened that we continue to see what she faces. Of course, the question now is what does the success of the film mean for Hollywood after the Box Office success of Black Panther, Coco and Crazy Rich Asians? More on that here and here. Plus this from Forbes on how “Latinos And (Crazy Rich) Asian Americans Are Hollywood’s Final Growth Frontier.” Patrice Tanaka, who you should also follow, has shared some great stories about Crazy Rich Asians and promoted the film, she did share this one that is critical of the movie.

I have been following the backlash the Washington Post received from Latino organizations and leaders over the story “White, and in the Minority.” The Columbia Journalism Review has this piece on the issues. I actually had reached out to the Washington Post before the NAHJ meeting and the CJR story were published because I had not seen a response. This is what I received, “The Washington Post has a long tradition of narrative reporting on the experiences of immigrants and minorities in America, as recent work by a number of Post reporters vividly demonstrates. Many of their stories recount the experiences of immigrants as they adapt to America and confront discrimination, shifting policies and other challenges. Terrence McCoy’s story captured the perspective of those who feel displaced by demographic change, by conveying what it is like for two white Americans who must themselves adapt to a new America. McCoy portrays their fear, resentment and xenophobia – as well as their responses to the attempts of their Latino co-workers to interact with them. McCoy’s work will continue to explore the emergence of a multicultural majority in America.” I leave the original article here, the piece from CJR and the response, so you can decide.

NPR also was criticized for the interview with hate group leader Jason Kessler, here is David Folkenflik on the backlash and read Brian Stelter’s piece on covering racists.

Other stories that i am following, this from CNN on the rise of Diversity & Inclusion jobs plus this on how to build a career in D&I; Citigroup’s three year goal to reverse its diversity failings; AARP has a new newsletter focused on African American women and Endeavor is now working with Papa John’s. If you are interested in D&I, the National Diversity Council offers a certification program

ICYMI Claudia Romo Edelman today shared that she was one of the special contributors for Marie Claire’s September issue focused on immigration. It is a must read! 

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

NAHJ, NPR report, ClassPass, Blavity, LULAC, N.B.A., “Vida”, Adweek, Walmart, Goldman Sachs, Humanæ & more

Last week the National Association of Hispanic Journalists hosted its conference in Miami and I loved having the opportunity to visit with some amazing journalists – the featured photo is one group – thank you Olivia Tallet! While visiting with attendees I had numerous conversations about the lack of Latinos as sources and how many Latino journalists continue to work to change this. On that note, thank you Lulu Garcia-Navarro for sharing this and this from @NPR that validates my earlier posts of lack of representation of Latinos in media. Of course this is not just a problem at NPR, look at this from the Columbia Journalism Review. The list we started of Latino sources now has close to 100 entries, so if you need Latinos as sources, save this link! Plus thanks to the NPR piece I found this – which I love – #womenalsoknowstuff. You can register as a source here but note “To be listed on this site, you must have: (i) a Ph.D. in political science or be working towards a Ph.D. in political science or (ii) be employed in an academic political science department.” CJR is also compiling a list, here is a link to that list (save this link too) and the form to submit other names.

This week there are many reasons to celebrate including ClassPass raising $85 million in Series D, Blavity securing $6.5 million in funding, Mindy Marqués Gonzalez, executive editor of the Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald, was inducted into the NAHJ Hall of Fame, I posted about two Latina entrepreneurs being profiled in key media publications this past weekend, LULAC selected Sindy Benavides as its first woman CEO and a first generation immigrant and Domingo Garcia was elected president. I had missed this article on five women mobilizing the Latino community for the midterms which includes Sindy. Also loved this story from the New York Times: “N.B.A. Power Brokers Gather, With No Men Allowed.”

Of course there is still so much work to do, which as Cindy Gallop points out is evidenced in Adweek’s Power list which only features 12 women and no African Americans. 

Stories I am following this week include “This VR Founder Wants to Gamify Empathy to Reduce Racial Bias,” “How Latinos Are Shaping America’s Future,” “Possible key to black boys’ academic success: Hire black men as elementary school teachers,” Walmart investing $2 million in “diversity internships,” and Goldman Sachs has named Erika Irish Brown as its new chief diversity officer. 

Other stories include this from NBC News about Diane Guerrero’s new book titled “My Family Divided,” this from FastCompany about sunscreen startups catering to “long-ignored minorities,” and this New York Times apology for its Los Angeles travel story – another example of the importance of having diverse talent in newsrooms.  Actually after you read the New York Times piece that led to the apology, read this about the show “Vida,” written by two Latina writers.  For more stories on Latinos, here is this week’s Latinx Collective.

ICYMI, watch this great TED Talk: “The beauty of human skin every color.” Not new but something that I read about this week.

The business case for diversity, L’Oréal, Nike, Amplify, DirecTV, diversity in finance, groups driving engagement and more

I want to thank those who have added names to the list of Latino sources for media, we are now up to 90. The list is open for anyone who wants to make additions.

We continue to see studies that speak to the business case for diversity. Here is this from Harvard Business Review which finds that “Diversity significantly improves financial performance on measures such as profitable investments at the individual portfolio-company level and overall fund returns.” In addition to the findings, it includes “evidenced-based recommendations.”

Other good reads this week, L’Oréal shared some diversity best practices as a member of the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion, read this from the Company’s CEO. There are many debates on how to fight bias and promote diversity. Here is this from Fast Company. Forbes published this titled  “Seven Ways To Address The Diversity Problem In Finance.” Here is this piece titled “Inside Nike’s purge: More than a #MeToo moment,” and this: “U.S. Bus Tour Promotes Unconscious-Bias Discussion.”

If you try to engage diverse audiences, you know there are many groups and organizations focused on driving engagement. For example, Ben Finzel created a LGBTQ networking group in DC, read more here. Christy Haubegger, who founded Latina Magazine, launched “the most comprehensive site for underrepresented writers” and it is called Amplify, learn more here.   Also, DirecTV and Reese Witherspoon announced a new production deal.

ICYMI here is this great piece by Esmeralda Bermudez where she asked people how language has shaped their world. Having moved to the U.S. when I was ten, I will always be grateful to my mother for ensuring we spoke Spanish. Being bilingual has enriched me personally and opened many doors professionally.

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

 

Let’s crowdsource a list of Latinos for Sunday news shows and media in general

Earlier this week I posted a blog with 50 Latinos that TV bookers and media in general could tap to talk about the Hispanic experience. Thank you for the comments and feedback, which tells me this was a much needed starting point – and this is a starting point. Enrique Acevedo said “We can all benefit from more diversity, not only of gender and race, but age and points of view as well.” Of course I agree but as I told him that doesn’t mean having the conversation of the lack of Latinos on Sunday and news shows is not important. The elections this year proves – and in particular this week in New York –  that age and gender diversity are key too.

Mariela Azcuy recommended making this a public list that others could add to – and others agreed. So here is a link to a document that you can help add names to and I’ll post an update next week. Have others to add? Go! http://bit.ly/LatinoSources

Photo by William White on Unsplash