Puerto Rico, Hispanic Heritage Month,  Col. Gil Coronado, Sol Trujillo, Fortune’s Most Powerful Women, Marc Pritchard and more

One year after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, here is this from the Takeaway titled “After The Storm: Stories of Puerto Rican Resilience” and CBS aired this special titled “Puerto Rico: The exodus after Hurricane Maria.” Want to help? Support PRxPR.

As many of you may know, Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated between September 15 and October 15 each year.  Watch this to learn more about how this month-long celebration started. Thank you Elaine Coronado for sharing. Here is more info on the celebration. There are numerous events and celebrations and many companies take the opportunity to host internal and/or external events, it is also a good time to spotlight the many contributions of Hispanics to the U.S. This from CNBC talks about the impact of Latino small businesses in the economy and watch Sol Trujillo talk about how Latinos are impacting the economy.  Here is this from Carlos Lozada from 2013 on who is Latino (or today Latinx) that also speaks to the history of the term Hispanic.

Some of the items I’m following this week: Fortune released the list of Most Powerful Women, an inspiring list of leaders, you can read more here. Axios had this article about how this Congress, depending on the election results, could be the more diverse in history and more accurately reflect the country.  Another week and another article about the importance of diversity in business.  Here is this great read titled “Why Confronting Our Unconscious Biases Is Both a Moral and Business Imperative.”

On the arts and entertainment front, the Getty Research Institute is launching an African American Art History initiative and Latinos made the “The Nun” #1 at the box office during its premiere week

ICYMI read this titled “Marc Pritchard shares personal journey around bias and labels.”

Photo by Elias Castillo on Unsplash

Crazy Rich Asians, Kelly Marie Tran, Washington Post, NPR, Marie Claire & More

This weekend I watched “Crazy Rich Asians” and it was such fun. Plus I love that, as many outlets noted, it once again proved the power of diversity. I also love the response by the Asian American community to the film, including this from Jane Mo or this from Kimberly Yam and of course the story about the letter sent to request the song Yellow from Cold Play. Then on Monday I was brought back to reality, about how much work needs to be done, after reading this from Kelly Marie Tran in the New York Times. I applaud her strength but saddened that we continue to see what she faces. Of course, the question now is what does the success of the film mean for Hollywood after the Box Office success of Black Panther, Coco and Crazy Rich Asians? More on that here and here. Plus this from Forbes on how “Latinos And (Crazy Rich) Asian Americans Are Hollywood’s Final Growth Frontier.” Patrice Tanaka, who you should also follow, has shared some great stories about Crazy Rich Asians and promoted the film, she did share this one that is critical of the movie.

I have been following the backlash the Washington Post received from Latino organizations and leaders over the story “White, and in the Minority.” The Columbia Journalism Review has this piece on the issues. I actually had reached out to the Washington Post before the NAHJ meeting and the CJR story were published because I had not seen a response. This is what I received, “The Washington Post has a long tradition of narrative reporting on the experiences of immigrants and minorities in America, as recent work by a number of Post reporters vividly demonstrates. Many of their stories recount the experiences of immigrants as they adapt to America and confront discrimination, shifting policies and other challenges. Terrence McCoy’s story captured the perspective of those who feel displaced by demographic change, by conveying what it is like for two white Americans who must themselves adapt to a new America. McCoy portrays their fear, resentment and xenophobia – as well as their responses to the attempts of their Latino co-workers to interact with them. McCoy’s work will continue to explore the emergence of a multicultural majority in America.” I leave the original article here, the piece from CJR and the response, so you can decide.

NPR also was criticized for the interview with hate group leader Jason Kessler, here is David Folkenflik on the backlash and read Brian Stelter’s piece on covering racists.

Other stories that i am following, this from CNN on the rise of Diversity & Inclusion jobs plus this on how to build a career in D&I; Citigroup’s three year goal to reverse its diversity failings; AARP has a new newsletter focused on African American women and Endeavor is now working with Papa John’s. If you are interested in D&I, the National Diversity Council offers a certification program

ICYMI Claudia Romo Edelman today shared that she was one of the special contributors for Marie Claire’s September issue focused on immigration. It is a must read! 

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

PRWeek 40 Under 40, Board Diversity, Annenberg Inclusion Initiative, Beth Ford, LeBron James & More

Every industry has “power” or “leadership” lists, conferences and events that are important validators, provide access and awareness and can be important both for companies and for individuals. Yes these are competitive. Yes they are time consuming. Yes many require an investment in time and many times funding.  Why are they important? You see those that are being recognized are getting access and potentially more opportunities. Representation matters. That is why every time we see a list, a panel or industry awards that lacks diversity we speak up. I’ve seen several lists recently that make me wonder what the barriers for having more diversity are – i.e. Adweek Power List. The most recent one PRWeek 40 Under 40. Now if you look at this year’s list, it is diverse, and according to editorial director Steve Barrett, it is the most diverse. However, I do wonder why there seems to be only one Hispanic and one Asian American on the list, especially if you look at the demographics. Steve says he sees this as an anomaly if you look at previous years. I believe him as I’ve seen first-hand PRWeek’s commitment to diversity, in fact they produced one of the best videos on the topic for the PR industry, so my questions in this instance are more to those that nominate professionals in our industry. Also, don’t get me wrong – yes every individual on that list deserves to be there. I am also not advocating for quotas, that would be a mistake, but I go back to the numbers and demographics. If this generation is more diverse, and if as I’ve been told, we are seeing more entry level diverse individuals in PR, why is this not reflected in this list? Are there barriers we are not thinking of? Could this impact the pipeline of Hispanic or Asian American talent in leadership roles in PR? Food for thought.

Board diversity continues to be another issue, and something getting coverage today because of CBS, this from the New York Times: “Mr. Moonves, 68, has been the chairman of the CBS board since 2016, and the majority of its 14 members started their tenures after he was appointed chief executive in 2006. Three of the 14 are women, and the board’s average age is 73.” Here is this 2017 report from Deloitte on board diversity, a recommended read. Also some good organizations to follow and work with on board diversity include Women Corporate Directors, The Executive Leadership Council, The Latino Corporate Directors Association and Ascend.

Other stories I am following this week, this Annenberg study that highlights the ongoing diversity issues in Hollywood, Latino leaders asking for Paramount boycott, “Venture Capitals Diversity Disaster,”and this from Forbes, “‘I Want To Hire Someone Who Is Nothing Like Me’: An Entrepreneur’s Approach To Diversity.”

Congratulations to Beth Ford, named Land O’Lakes president and CEO and breaking new barriers. I love this, “Two Kenyan Entrepreneurs Create and Afrocentric Stock Photo Marketplace,”  and of course the new LeBron James school. Watch his CNN interview here. Also congratulations to Jorge Plasencia and Ilia Calderon being honored by HPRA this year!

ICYMI “Your Career, Your Terms” is a resource for women. Created by Perry Yeatman she has great interviews that, as the site describes “provides insights and inspiration to help ambitious women have the careers and lives of their dreams.” Don’t miss the second season of “Your Career, Your Terms: Pivot Points.”

Photo by Andre Hunter on Unsplash

NAHJ, NPR report, ClassPass, Blavity, LULAC, N.B.A., “Vida”, Adweek, Walmart, Goldman Sachs, Humanæ & more

Last week the National Association of Hispanic Journalists hosted its conference in Miami and I loved having the opportunity to visit with some amazing journalists – the featured photo is one group – thank you Olivia Tallet! While visiting with attendees I had numerous conversations about the lack of Latinos as sources and how many Latino journalists continue to work to change this. On that note, thank you Lulu Garcia-Navarro for sharing this and this from @NPR that validates my earlier posts of lack of representation of Latinos in media. Of course this is not just a problem at NPR, look at this from the Columbia Journalism Review. The list we started of Latino sources now has close to 100 entries, so if you need Latinos as sources, save this link! Plus thanks to the NPR piece I found this – which I love – #womenalsoknowstuff. You can register as a source here but note “To be listed on this site, you must have: (i) a Ph.D. in political science or be working towards a Ph.D. in political science or (ii) be employed in an academic political science department.” CJR is also compiling a list, here is a link to that list (save this link too) and the form to submit other names.

This week there are many reasons to celebrate including ClassPass raising $85 million in Series D, Blavity securing $6.5 million in funding, Mindy Marqués Gonzalez, executive editor of the Miami Herald and el Nuevo Herald, was inducted into the NAHJ Hall of Fame, I posted about two Latina entrepreneurs being profiled in key media publications this past weekend, LULAC selected Sindy Benavides as its first woman CEO and a first generation immigrant and Domingo Garcia was elected president. I had missed this article on five women mobilizing the Latino community for the midterms which includes Sindy. Also loved this story from the New York Times: “N.B.A. Power Brokers Gather, With No Men Allowed.”

Of course there is still so much work to do, which as Cindy Gallop points out is evidenced in Adweek’s Power list which only features 12 women and no African Americans. 

Stories I am following this week include “This VR Founder Wants to Gamify Empathy to Reduce Racial Bias,” “How Latinos Are Shaping America’s Future,” “Possible key to black boys’ academic success: Hire black men as elementary school teachers,” Walmart investing $2 million in “diversity internships,” and Goldman Sachs has named Erika Irish Brown as its new chief diversity officer. 

Other stories include this from NBC News about Diane Guerrero’s new book titled “My Family Divided,” this from FastCompany about sunscreen startups catering to “long-ignored minorities,” and this New York Times apology for its Los Angeles travel story – another example of the importance of having diverse talent in newsrooms.  Actually after you read the New York Times piece that led to the apology, read this about the show “Vida,” written by two Latina writers.  For more stories on Latinos, here is this week’s Latinx Collective.

ICYMI, watch this great TED Talk: “The beauty of human skin every color.” Not new but something that I read about this week.

Heineken USA, Starbucks, Google, diversity in tech, Variety and more

Feels like a great morning when you wake up to a Google Doodle honoring Dr. Virginia Apgar for her contributions to neonatology and to read that Heineken USA named Maggie Timoney as its CEO – which as AdAge mentions, shatters the industry’s glass ceiling. This follows the announcement earlier this week that Mellody Hobson, which as Black Enterprise points out, “is one of the most respected and knowledgeable black business leaders” will become  vice chair at Starbucks when Howard Schultz steps down at the end of the month. This is all welcomed news because there is so much work to be done.  

As you may have read, Google employees spoke up about their concerns regarding diversity. Here is this from CNN:  “Google employee confronts execs over diversity: Many of us feel ‘unsafe.” This is an important story to follow, not only about Google but about the tech industry in general. Oh and Google voted the proposal down. Read Fortune’s CEO Daily for more on this. Here is a great read on what needs to happen to drive change, as this LA Times story says, as “diversity fatigue has set in.” There are a number of programs and initiatives trying to address this issue. Thank you Silvina Moschini for sharing this titled “How this coding bootcamp is helping women land tech jobs at Reddit, Facebook and Amazon.”

On the entertainment side, you may have read that Variety’s “A Night in the Writer’s Room” event because of its lack of representation of women. Read more on his this unfolded on Twitter.  You also may have read about The MACRO Episodic Lab Powered by The Black List.

One of my favorite Twitter accounts to follow is @writersofcolor – where opportunities and diverse talent connect because as the twitter bio says “we don’t want to hear *I can’t find any* ever again, okay?”

ICYMI “12 Quotes To Motivate CMOs To Make Diversity A Priority.”

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Puerto Rico, #WhereAreTheChildren Movement, Starbucks, Roseanne, Female CEOs & more

This past week there have been important stories that should not get lost and are focused on Puerto Rico and immigration. These two stories speak to the important role media, academia and organizations play in ensuring the voices of the voiceless are heard and why diversity is important. 

If you missed this important story, here is CBS’s coverage of the Harvard report. I share this story because David Begnaud at CBS has done an outstanding job of covering Puerto Rico since Hurricane Maria hit, here is more on his coverage. In fact, he will be honored at the Puerto Rican Day Parade because of his work – he also received The Polk award for his coverage. However, it t is important to note that many reporters have been focused on covering Puerto Rico, on the numbers given by the government and asking for updated numbers for some time, including Julio Varela and Latino Rebels as well as Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism.

The other story that broke last week was regarding the administration’s policy on family separation and the more than 1,400 children that are unaccounted for. There are different issues here. 1) unaccompanied minors coming to the U.S., 2) the  family policy unveiled by this administration in early May and 3) there is the issue of the reports of abuse of these kids in custody. Here is this from Yahoo! that explains the different issues. These are important stories that need to continue to be covered and having diverse journalists that understand the issues will be important.

For me one area of frustration is the lack of Latinos on the Sunday talk shows – this is from 2017 but speaks to the issue…and Latinos need to be invited not only to talk about immigration. As you may recall, last week I wrote about the lack of diversity in media, here is a tweet from Astead Herndon, national politics reporter at the New York Times about why diversity is important. I don’t want to ignore when diversity gets an important platform in media. I missed the “Everyday Racism in America” discussion on MSNBC but hope to watch it later this week. Here’s a link.  Note this is a link from twitter which shows more than 950K viewers on the platform, I wonder what the TV ratings will be?

On Tuesday afternoon Starbucks closed its stores for the diversity training. The WSJ focused on how this potentially helped competitors, while other media like USA Today focused on the training itself. Here is this good piece from the Dallas Morning News, where they invited companies recognized for diversity to talk about their D&I efforts. Unfortunately the story dominating the news yesterday was Roseanne being canceled because of a racist tweet. I am not sure anyone was surprised by her tweet. The surprise was the swift action by ABC, Viacom’s channels and Hulu as they canceled and/or pulled the show.

Other stories from this week, Snapchat’s diversity, this titled “What’s Behind the Decline in Female CEOs,” Revlon naming its first woman CEO and Law.com’s Diversity Scorecard.

Congratulations to the amazing Girl Scouts CEO Sylvia Acevedo, she was named one of Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People in Business – and I could not agree more!

Photo by Dmitry Schemelev on Unsplash

 

Allure’s May issue, Dallas Morning News “Questions of Color” series, Sexist AI Bots, new Girl Scouts PSA and More

Let me start with a quick reminder that May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. Allure’s cover this month features “three game-changing Asian models.” Editor in Chief Michelle Lee  talks about the importance of this issue here. Michelle is someone I follow closely because as Rebecca Sun says “She is why representation matters not just on the covers but on the mastheads as well. Happy #APAHM!!”

A few years ago I had the pleasure of meeting a sharp reporter who had graduated from my alma mater and was interning at the Wall Street Journal, Cassandra Jaramillo. She is now working at the Dallas Morning News and I’ve included her coverage here before. In other words, you too should you follow her. Here is her most recent work that is part of  the publication’s series “Questions of Color” and titled How Texas couples navigate race, culture — and resistance.”

I’ll be writing more on AI at a later time but this from Robert LoCascio titled “Thousands of Sexist AI Bots Could Be Coming. Here’s How We Can Stop Them,” is an important read. As he reminds us “The AI of today was developed by predominantly white male engineers in too much of a hurry to challenge their own chauvinism or consider the harm their work could do.”

This week I am following Amazon’s commitment to increasing board diversity, also this from BlackRock’s Diversity Chief  Jonathan McBride and this on Nike’s new diversity initiative  On the board diversity point, here is this great piece from the Harvard Business Review.

ICYMI Queen Latifah narrates Girl Scouts’ new star-studded leadership PSA, watch it here.

Photo by Hai Phung on Unsplash

 

2018 diversity conferences, Forbes, Uber, The Grammy Awards & more

Here is this list of 2018 diversity conferences and events that may be of interest. In addition, here is this great resource for blogging conferences, The National Diversity Council has this helpful calendar and there is this resource for Women in Technology conferences. These resources do not include industry specific events but if you need help in identifying events and conferences that will help you achieve your goals, send an email to monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

Forbes released its “first-ever list of America’s Best Employers for Diversity.” It partnered with Statista in looking at 250 U.S. employers across all industries.  Here is the list and more on the methodology.

Talking about firsts, Uber announced it has hired its first chief diversity officer. Bo Young Lee is joining from Marsh & McLennan. Recently Bernard Coleman III from Uber published this article on D&I with the focus on inclusion. More and more I see “inclusion” as one of the key themes of 2018.

Here is this story from The New York Times titled, “After #OscarsSoWhite, Hispanics Seek Their Hollywood Moment” focused on the lack of Hispanic representation in the entertainment industry.  

Also on the entertainment front, in advance of the Grammy Awards, the Recording Academy received accolades for diversity with acknowledgment that there is work to be done, just look at this study.  And then the show took place. Of course there was the issue of women representation. The Academy’s response? “Women need to step up.” This of course caused an uproar. Then Despacito was snubbed. Yes the #1 song of 2017. This article puts it into perspective. There is also this one. I think we all agree, and not to repeat myself, but there is so much work to be done. Update: Here are two more recommended reads, this from Leila Cobo at Billboard and this one from Marisa Arbona-Ruiz at NPR’s Alt.Latino.

Keeping with the music theme, here is this week’s ICYMI, last year Latino artists dominated ”YouTube’s top 10 music videos.” 

Photo by Ian Schneider on Unsplash

Two new diversity reports, Women’s March, CEO Action, Apple partners with Malala Fund, Oscars, RENEWPR & more

This week let’s start with two reports that prove (again) that if you want a more innovative and stronger performing company you need diversity.

Here is this report from McKinsey, which expands on the one released in 2015 and which says that, “The business case for diversity continues to be compelling and to have global relevance.”  

FastCompany wrote about this second report titled “Do Pro-Diversity Policies Improve Corporate Innovation?”. The big takeaway is that: “Companies that fulfill all nine positive diversity requirements announce an average of two extra products in any given year, which about doubles the average for a major company (those that tick fewer boxes are less innovative proportionally). Moreover, the researchers find that companies with pro-diversity policies were also more resilient in terms of innovation during the 2008 financial crisis.”

The Sunday shows did not focus much of their time on the Women’s March this year…let’s keep that in mind as you read this headline, How the Women’s March Is Turning Protesters Into Politicians.” 

As you may recall, last year the CEO Action Pledge for Diversity and Inclusion (CEO Action) was announced. Today it has more than 350 member companies representing 85 different industries. The group recently convened C-level executives to discuss their efforts, more information here

On the education front, Apple announced yesterday that it is partnering with the Malala Fund to support education for girls. According to the announcement, the partnership is “designed to enable the nonprofit to double the number of grants it offers and extend its funding programs to India and Latin America.”

Another story that got my attention is this one from the Washington Post titled “These kids started a book club for minority boys. It’s the most popular club in school.”  Finding and having the students’ read books that represent them is driving engagement. This is a great model and hope other schools, libraries and educational institutions take notice.

Congratulations to Ben Finzel and our friends at RENEWPR on their third year anniversary – read more here on how the team is celebrating this milestone.

Let’s close with two of my favorite recent videos:

  • This one in which Ava DuVernay used her speech at the Image Awards to celebrate others, bravo!
  • Then there’s this one, listen to this part and see Ricky Martin’s reaction:  “I seriously went very berserk on Dean Richards because you have to understand, when you’re part of a minority, and you don’t have a lot of role models in media, and you have a Ricky Martin that wherever you go in the world, it’s a good name to mention as a Puerto Rican, oh my goodness you feel related to him.”

Here’s hoping to see much more representation in media and that Ana Belava meets Ricky soon!

Photo by Mohamed Lammah on Unsplash

 

The Golden Globes, why representation matters, Rebecca Aguilar launches Facebook group for Latina journalists, and more

Happy Tuesday. This week I have to start with the Golden Globes. I wasn’t sure on what to expect but was pleasantly surprised at how it became a “female empowerment event” as also described by Gamespot. There was of course Oprah Winfrey’s acceptance speech as the first black woman to receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award (link here if you missed it). There were other firsts including Sterling K. Brown as first African-American actor to win in the best actor in TV Drama and Aziz Ansari becoming the first Asian-American to win for best actor in a TV comedy. 

This year activists became the real stars of the Red Carpet, read more here. One of my favorite moments on the Red Carpet was this by Viola Davis. I also recommend reading  this piece from Jane Randel about #TimesUp. As she says “Changing the conversation is more complex and time-consuming, conceptually harder to understand, and oddly more discomforting to discuss because it forces us to look at our own behaviors.” 

Back to Oprah. One of the most important messages in her speech for me was that representation matters. This is why the conversation on diversity is so important. So let’s talk representation and start with this on Latinas in newsrooms. Monica Castillo, film writer for the New York Times Watching, shared these percentages of Latinas in newsrooms:

2.47%  – print newspapers

8.7% – TV news

4.2% – Radio.

Rebecca Aguilar launched a Facebook group for Latina journalists to create a community because as she says: “If no one else will open the doors for us, we will open them.” Bravo!

Now two examples of why representation also matters. 1) The New York Times identifying Rita Moreno as a guest in a photo caption. I get it that in red carpets things move quickly but really? Remember, she is one of the few entertainers to to have won an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony. 2) H&M. That’s all I’ll say. Read more here.  It is unacceptable that these mistakes are happening today and I do believe that if you had more diversity this would not happen.

Another story driving the conversation this week, Carrie Gracie resigning from her post at the BBC because of the gender gap pay.

Here is this shared by Tanzina Vega and a great read: “Women of Color Will Reclaim and Monetize Our Time.”  

Other recommended reads for this week: 7 CMOs Myths About Hispanic Marketing, “Gallup poll: Soccer closes in on big three as most popular U.S. spectator sport,” and  this Cindy Gallop profile (btw great content by MM.LAFLEUR).

And the ICYMI of the week: “New UC Irvine dean will be only woman of color to lead a top law school, university says.” Congratulations!

Be on the lookout for the list of conferences to attend, I’ll post those soon.

Photo by hannah grace on Unsplash