First Ever Hispanic Leadership Summit

“We are fragmented, underrepresented and misperceived, so we need to think less like 26 different nationalities and more as one community. In my heart, I know unification is what our Hispanic community lacks at this pivotal moment in history,” Claudia Romo Edelman

Today in New York City, the We Are All Humans Foundation has convened the first ever Hispanic Leadership Summit. Read more here from Claudia about this historic event in which more than 350 leaders will try to answer some key questions. Here is the link to the event’s website.

The questions asked focus on how to move forward as a community and how success will depend on:

  • Recognizing that the time is now for unifying.
  • Appreciating that we have a distinct window of opportunity before us.
  • Having the courage to address what gets in the way of our potential.
  • Believing our goals are achievable.
  • Accepting this invitation to act.

You can read Claudia’s blog post here: https://www.weareallhuman.org/vision/ and join the conversation via social media by following @WAAH_Foundation and Claudia Romo Edelman on Twitter, weare_allhuman on Instagram and the hashtag #HispanicSummit2018.

I recognize that by coming together to work toward common goals while amplifying the voices of the growing, diverse and dynamic Hispanic population, will ultimately drive positive change. I cannot wait to learn more about the discussion and outcomes from today.

Crazy Rich Asians, Kelly Marie Tran, Washington Post, NPR, Marie Claire & More

This weekend I watched “Crazy Rich Asians” and it was such fun. Plus I love that, as many outlets noted, it once again proved the power of diversity. I also love the response by the Asian American community to the film, including this from Jane Mo or this from Kimberly Yam and of course the story about the letter sent to request the song Yellow from Cold Play. Then on Monday I was brought back to reality, about how much work needs to be done, after reading this from Kelly Marie Tran in the New York Times. I applaud her strength but saddened that we continue to see what she faces. Of course, the question now is what does the success of the film mean for Hollywood after the Box Office success of Black Panther, Coco and Crazy Rich Asians? More on that here and here. Plus this from Forbes on how “Latinos And (Crazy Rich) Asian Americans Are Hollywood’s Final Growth Frontier.” Patrice Tanaka, who you should also follow, has shared some great stories about Crazy Rich Asians and promoted the film, she did share this one that is critical of the movie.

I have been following the backlash the Washington Post received from Latino organizations and leaders over the story “White, and in the Minority.” The Columbia Journalism Review has this piece on the issues. I actually had reached out to the Washington Post before the NAHJ meeting and the CJR story were published because I had not seen a response. This is what I received, “The Washington Post has a long tradition of narrative reporting on the experiences of immigrants and minorities in America, as recent work by a number of Post reporters vividly demonstrates. Many of their stories recount the experiences of immigrants as they adapt to America and confront discrimination, shifting policies and other challenges. Terrence McCoy’s story captured the perspective of those who feel displaced by demographic change, by conveying what it is like for two white Americans who must themselves adapt to a new America. McCoy portrays their fear, resentment and xenophobia – as well as their responses to the attempts of their Latino co-workers to interact with them. McCoy’s work will continue to explore the emergence of a multicultural majority in America.” I leave the original article here, the piece from CJR and the response, so you can decide.

NPR also was criticized for the interview with hate group leader Jason Kessler, here is David Folkenflik on the backlash and read Brian Stelter’s piece on covering racists.

Other stories that i am following, this from CNN on the rise of Diversity & Inclusion jobs plus this on how to build a career in D&I; Citigroup’s three year goal to reverse its diversity failings; AARP has a new newsletter focused on African American women and Endeavor is now working with Papa John’s. If you are interested in D&I, the National Diversity Council offers a certification program

ICYMI Claudia Romo Edelman today shared that she was one of the special contributors for Marie Claire’s September issue focused on immigration. It is a must read! 

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Nonprofit diversity, Harvard, Vogue, Magazine Covers, Politics, Startups and the PR industry in the #MeToo era

Every day I save articles to include in the weekly blog post, and also do some searches to find some of the best coverage about diversity. That is why I appreciate it when some of you share articles I may have missed or catch a mistake and flag it for me. Thank you Xochitl Yañez for sharing this one focused on diversity in nonprofits, a very interesting read.

I also follow a number of individuals that share great content, including pieces they have written. Here is this from Monica Castillo focused on language, Ana Valdez shared this written by Miriam Rivera titled “How to be an ally in a diverse community,” One area that I focus on is startups, and follow leaders like Arlan Hamilton and Mandela SH Dixon and try to include articles like this piece on “105 black and latino founders who have raised $1mm+ in VC funding…”

One of the topics I talk about almost every week is that representation matters, which is why we we should celebrate that  “For the First Time, Black Women Will Run Four Schools at Harvard University,” and that, as the CNBC headline states,Women are shattering records in the 2018 primaries with more than a dozen states still to go.”Another story on the politics side, in Michigan, the Democrats have an all-female statewide ticket.  On the entertainment side, the fact that black women are on a number of magazine covers this month is also something to celebrate. Also, if you missed this from Vogue about advice for your 20 year old self based on Beyonce’s cover story, it is a great read.

We do have a long way to go, which is why Tuesday was Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, read more here. This New York Times piece “When a Female C.E.O. Leaves, the Glass Ceiling is Restored” has great insights and data in general about women in the C suite.  

Finally, ICYMI, here is a must read post by Jane Randel, co-founder of Karp Randel, focused on #MeToo and the PR industry.

Thank you for reading and following. Please share any articles you think are important to include!

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Heineken USA, Starbucks, Google, diversity in tech, Variety and more

Feels like a great morning when you wake up to a Google Doodle honoring Dr. Virginia Apgar for her contributions to neonatology and to read that Heineken USA named Maggie Timoney as its CEO – which as AdAge mentions, shatters the industry’s glass ceiling. This follows the announcement earlier this week that Mellody Hobson, which as Black Enterprise points out, “is one of the most respected and knowledgeable black business leaders” will become  vice chair at Starbucks when Howard Schultz steps down at the end of the month. This is all welcomed news because there is so much work to be done.  

As you may have read, Google employees spoke up about their concerns regarding diversity. Here is this from CNN:  “Google employee confronts execs over diversity: Many of us feel ‘unsafe.” This is an important story to follow, not only about Google but about the tech industry in general. Oh and Google voted the proposal down. Read Fortune’s CEO Daily for more on this. Here is a great read on what needs to happen to drive change, as this LA Times story says, as “diversity fatigue has set in.” There are a number of programs and initiatives trying to address this issue. Thank you Silvina Moschini for sharing this titled “How this coding bootcamp is helping women land tech jobs at Reddit, Facebook and Amazon.”

On the entertainment side, you may have read that Variety’s “A Night in the Writer’s Room” event because of its lack of representation of women. Read more on his this unfolded on Twitter.  You also may have read about The MACRO Episodic Lab Powered by The Black List.

One of my favorite Twitter accounts to follow is @writersofcolor – where opportunities and diverse talent connect because as the twitter bio says “we don’t want to hear *I can’t find any* ever again, okay?”

ICYMI “12 Quotes To Motivate CMOs To Make Diversity A Priority.”

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Cinco de Mayo, Top Companies for Diversity, New Boy Scouts Name, Girl Scouts response, plus more

As we head into the weekend there will be thousands of Cinco de Mayo celebrations around the country…and when I say country I mean the United States, not Mexico. Because as you can read here, here and here, it is not Mexican Independence Day and not as big a holiday in Mexico. Cassandra Jaramillo wrote this about how activists encouraged Cinco de Mayo to celebrate culture. Marketing, primarily by beer companies, is why the holiday is what it is today.  Companies spend millions, and so do consumers, but you have to be careful to not be offensive, as MSNBC, Golin, GMA and many others have learned.  Some Latinos dread the Holiday because of the stereotypes. Many of us can relate to this tweet from Laura Martinez.  

If you need more backup on why diversity matters, read this from Big Think titled “Diversity is more than a box to tick. It’s a smart business strategy.” Late last month Uber released its diversity report. This week the 2018 DiversityInc Top Companies for Diversity was released – the top three companies are Johnson & Johnson, Marriott International and AT&T.

This week we also saw the Boy Scouts drop “Boys” from its name and it is now being called “Scouts BSA” as they prepare to welcome girls. The Girl Scouts responded by saying they’ll remain the first choice for girls.

Some of the other stories I followed this week include this great read from Remezcla titled “How to Make it in Journalism,” this from MediaPost about what language to use for B2B marketing and the frustration from black lawmakers for the lack of diversity in tech.

This is one of my favorite “feel good stories” of the week, the two men arrested at Starbucks settled with the City of Philadelphia for $1 each and a commitment to create a $200,000 fund for young entrepreneurs. As CNN says here, they are paying it forward.

ICYMI – if you want to see Black Twitter in action, look up the #IfSlaveryWereAChoice hashtag and read more here.

Photo by Cesira Alvarado on Unsplash

Starbucks, Beyoncé, Cardi B, Morgan Stanley, the Pulitzer Prizes, Desiree Linden, Hispanicize & more

We continue to see the controversy of what happened at a Starbucks in Philadelphia play out, and the CEO will meet with the two men who were arrested. Here is this great piece from The Root that speaks to one of the themes that gained traction on social, why more voices need to speak up. Starbucks is now taking action but it seemed slow to respond, at least if you were following on social, and the first statement did not help. Here is a good piece on how it’s been managed. Most importantly, this from Melissa DePino who took the original video. Her closing is key: “People keep asking me what I hope will happen now, and I do have something to say about that. I hope that many more of us will say something when we see something, educate ourselves and join in an honest — even if it’s painful or uncomfortable — conversation about race, a conversation that needs to happen and is long overdue.” UPDATE: Starbucks announced that it is closing 8,000 U.S. stores temporarily on May 29 for racial-bias training.

Here is this from last year on why cultural perspective, including black twitter, is important.  So on that note, this weekend Coachella became Baychella. Beyoncé played a two hour set which from what I’ve seen was incredible and a celebration of black culture. The reviews say it all, read New York Times and Rolling Stone. She became the first black woman to headline the event and she also  announced $100,000 scholarship fund to black colleges. Here is one tweet that speaks to why we push back when we hear that there is no diverse talent. This weekend Cardi B also performed at Coachella and following her newest release is now “just the fifth female hip-hop musician to sore a No. 1 album.”  

Yesterday the Pulitzer prize winners were announced and Kendrik Lamar won for music and all I could think of was the GRAMMYs…and I wasn’t the only one. In addition, both the New York Times and The New Yorker were recognized for their coverage of the #MeToo Movement.

Morgan Stanley announced the second cohort of the its Multicultural Innovation Lab. Here is Carla Harris speaking about investing in diversity.

Other news I am following, The Collage Group released this report titled “The Big Shift: Multicultural Consumers Had a Strong Positive Impact on Most Industries over the Past Decade;” Nike’s diversity lead departs during review of corporate culture, Arianna Huffington talked about everyone needing to speak about diversity. Campaign US announced Campaign I&C Top 20  which “honors the brands and creative teams behind a new wave of advertising that reflects the richness and diversity of 21st century America.” Here is the site to nominate your ad. 

Yesterday was the Boston Marathon and  I am now a Desiree Linden fan, Not only because she is the first American woman to win the Boston Marathon since 1985 or because she is Latina. It is because she won after slowing down to wait for another American because she did not think she (Landen) would finish. A selfless act that speaks to leadership and teamwork.

Today is the first day of Hispanicize, follow online with the hashtag #Hispz18.

Congratulations to Shuronda Robinson for the 23rd anniversary of her agency Adisa Communications. Read her post here reflecting on her journey.  

ICYMI Heinz promoted its mayo-ketchup sauce, causing a twitter debate. I tasted it many years ago during a trip to Venezuela. I don’t like mayo so not my thing but I loved Goya’s response.

Photo by Autumn Goodman on Unsplash

Men as Allies, Tony Robbins and #MeToo, Workforce Diversity Success Tips, Adweek, Variety, First Latina CEO & more

Last week I attended an event in which the importance of men as allies was discussed and then I read this in the Wall Street Journal titled “Men Learn How to Be ‘Allies,’ Without Fear, to Female Colleagues.” It includes research that says that 55% of men in the U.S. said they found it “harder for them to know how to interact with women at work, according to a new Pew Research Center Poll of more than 6,000 adults.”  That is why the example Tony Robbins gave this weekend about his high profile client is so disturbing. Why would Mr. Robbins not stop his client and call him on how wrong not hiring the female candidate was, the more qualified candidate, because she was attractive? He blamed the #MeToo movement. Mr. Robbins has apologized but my bigger question is what is he telling clients now? Maybe as a coach he could help him address his concerns in a way where women are not negatively impacted by HIS issues? He could become an ally. 

We will continue to see the theme of men as allies as an important part of positive change. In this post Melinda Gates  (which talks about much more and is an important read) she says, “Men, this is your invitation to be an ally.” For those interested in learning and doing more, I did find the Forté Men as Allies Initiative. The site includes research and resources and encourages men to create ally groups. You can find information here. Maybe Tony Robbins should look them up….

In other news, The Harvard Business Review recently published two interesting pieces: “5 Things We Learned About Creating a Successful Workplace Diversity Program” and  “How to Use Employee Referrals Without Giving Up Workplace Diversity.” Both include good tips as you continue to work to foster diversity in your organizations. Susan Wojcicki, YouTube CEO, also shared some good tips here for tech companies and Susan Giles wrote about why diversity is essential for innovation. This week CNN profiled Geisha Williams, CEO and President of PG&E Corp, who is the first Latina CEO of a major U.S. company.  

Congratulations to the incredible leaders celebrated in AdWeek’s “11 Inspiring Women Who Have Broken Down Advertising’s Most Persistent Barriers.” Variety also released its 2018 Power of Women New York Impact List. Here is the weekly update on the record breaking Black Panther, this past week it passed “The Titanic.’

ICYMI this by Julio Ricardo Varela titled “The trouble with being the ‘only Latino in the room’’ is another recommended read for the week.

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