Cinco de Mayo, Top Companies for Diversity, New Boy Scouts Name, Girl Scouts response, plus more

As we head into the weekend there will be thousands of Cinco de Mayo celebrations around the country…and when I say country I mean the United States, not Mexico. Because as you can read here, here and here, it is not Mexican Independence Day and not as big a holiday in Mexico. Cassandra Jaramillo wrote this about how activists encouraged Cinco de Mayo to celebrate culture. Marketing, primarily by beer companies, is why the holiday is what it is today.  Companies spend millions, and so do consumers, but you have to be careful to not be offensive, as MSNBC, Golin, GMA and many others have learned.  Some Latinos dread the Holiday because of the stereotypes. Many of us can relate to this tweet from Laura Martinez.  

If you need more backup on why diversity matters, read this from Big Think titled “Diversity is more than a box to tick. It’s a smart business strategy.” Late last month Uber released its diversity report. This week the 2018 DiversityInc Top Companies for Diversity was released – the top three companies are Johnson & Johnson, Marriott International and AT&T.

This week we also saw the Boy Scouts drop “Boys” from its name and it is now being called “Scouts BSA” as they prepare to welcome girls. The Girl Scouts responded by saying they’ll remain the first choice for girls.

Some of the other stories I followed this week include this great read from Remezcla titled “How to Make it in Journalism,” this from MediaPost about what language to use for B2B marketing and the frustration from black lawmakers for the lack of diversity in tech.

This is one of my favorite “feel good stories” of the week, the two men arrested at Starbucks settled with the City of Philadelphia for $1 each and a commitment to create a $200,000 fund for young entrepreneurs. As CNN says here, they are paying it forward.

ICYMI – if you want to see Black Twitter in action, look up the #IfSlaveryWereAChoice hashtag and read more here.

Photo by Cesira Alvarado on Unsplash

Diversity in PR, Karen Kahn from HP, #LatinoJobs, Accenture, D&I jobs, and Brookings report on diversity

I had missed this article regarding PR agencies and diversity and the author provides a lot of great insights and information. I do however believe many of the recommendations are already being implemented and that agencies need to rethink their approach as there is still significant work to be done. One point in the research that caught my attention was the lack of consensus on the definition of diversity. So I asked HP Chief Communications Officer Karen Kahn how the Company defines diversity. You see HP has taken a leadership role in this area so I wanted to learn about its approach. Karen said diversity is defined as “underrepresented groups – and as a global organization it differs by country.” What most impressed me about the conversation was the internal focus and how this has been discussed at length internally and that there is consensus. I think HP has gotten it right because for the leadership team diversity is not left to just one person or group within the company and there is a real commitment to look both at how to address internally and with partners and vendors. There’s a reason why it was recognized as company of the year for diversity by CIO magazine last year. I would encourage companies to make sure there is internal consensus and that everyone within the organization understands the definition as well as the approach so that they can engage and recognize their role in this effort.

Talking about HP, last week at Hispanicize the Company unveiled  the latest in the “Reinvent Mindsets” campaign. Created by Miami based agency Alma and it is titled #LatinoJobs.

Other news I am following, this Indeed report on the growth of D&I jobs, Accenture CEO discussing gender equality goals, watch what Adweek describes as “Maltesers’ Wonderfully Awkward Diversity Ads,” this Brookings Institution report titled “Black and Hispanic underrepresentation in tech: It’s time to change the equation” and  this from the Chicago Tribune titled “Black art spurs gold rush as collector stampede drives up prices,”

ICYMI, here is this week’s Black Panther update from Business Insider: ‘Black Panther’ has made 5 times as much money in the US as any other movie in 2018.

Photo by Ayo Ogunseinde on Unsplash

Men as Allies, Tony Robbins and #MeToo, Workforce Diversity Success Tips, Adweek, Variety, First Latina CEO & more

Last week I attended an event in which the importance of men as allies was discussed and then I read this in the Wall Street Journal titled “Men Learn How to Be ‘Allies,’ Without Fear, to Female Colleagues.” It includes research that says that 55% of men in the U.S. said they found it “harder for them to know how to interact with women at work, according to a new Pew Research Center Poll of more than 6,000 adults.”  That is why the example Tony Robbins gave this weekend about his high profile client is so disturbing. Why would Mr. Robbins not stop his client and call him on how wrong not hiring the female candidate was, the more qualified candidate, because she was attractive? He blamed the #MeToo movement. Mr. Robbins has apologized but my bigger question is what is he telling clients now? Maybe as a coach he could help him address his concerns in a way where women are not negatively impacted by HIS issues? He could become an ally. 

We will continue to see the theme of men as allies as an important part of positive change. In this post Melinda Gates  (which talks about much more and is an important read) she says, “Men, this is your invitation to be an ally.” For those interested in learning and doing more, I did find the Forté Men as Allies Initiative. The site includes research and resources and encourages men to create ally groups. You can find information here. Maybe Tony Robbins should look them up….

In other news, The Harvard Business Review recently published two interesting pieces: “5 Things We Learned About Creating a Successful Workplace Diversity Program” and  “How to Use Employee Referrals Without Giving Up Workplace Diversity.” Both include good tips as you continue to work to foster diversity in your organizations. Susan Wojcicki, YouTube CEO, also shared some good tips here for tech companies and Susan Giles wrote about why diversity is essential for innovation. This week CNN profiled Geisha Williams, CEO and President of PG&E Corp, who is the first Latina CEO of a major U.S. company.  

Congratulations to the incredible leaders celebrated in AdWeek’s “11 Inspiring Women Who Have Broken Down Advertising’s Most Persistent Barriers.” Variety also released its 2018 Power of Women New York Impact List. Here is the weekly update on the record breaking Black Panther, this past week it passed “The Titanic.’

ICYMI this by Julio Ricardo Varela titled “The trouble with being the ‘only Latino in the room’’ is another recommended read for the week.

Photo by rawpixel.com on Unsplash

Diversity & March for Our Lives, the Box Office, Chance The Rapper, Intel’s Diversity Report & More

These past few days there has been extensive coverage about the March for Our Lives movement and the marches. Regardless of your politics you have to recognize and salute these students for what they have accomplished, in many instances as they grieved. Many of them opting, as The Onion reminded us, to do this instead of partying during Spring Break. What also is impressive is how the organizers of this movement have recognized that that they have an important platform, acknowledged their privilege and welcomed diversity. Some of the most impactful speeches and moments at the march were led by women and girls with diverse backgrounds. Probably the most talked about moment was Emma Gonzalez’s speech…and silence.  Then there were speeches by nine-year-old Yolanda Renee King, Dr. Martin Luther King’s granddaughter; 11-year-old Naomi Wadler’s and 17 year-old Edna Chavez. You can watch all of the speeches from DC here. Following the marches there have been some unfortunate moments including a post by Representative Steve King criticizing Emma. The only reason I highlight this is because the response from Monica Castillo in The Lily is a must read. Here is my favorite line because as a bilingual, bicultural immigrant, I can attest it’s true: “Most of us wear our biculturalism proudly every day. Maybe not on our clothes, but in how we celebrate our culture, our language, food or practices.”

If you missed this one, Chance the Rapper called out Heineken for an ad he called “terribly racist.” Read more here.  In one of his tweets he says he is “pointing out that alot of these marketing agencies are doing willfully so we overreact and tweet about it.” As far as this campaign goes, Heineken has removed the ad, which you can still find online. This is the latest brand missing the mark when it comes to diversity, and I do hope it is ignorance and not more. However, it is again a reminder on why diverse teams in advertising and marketing are important.  I don’t know if the team or agency changed from last year but not sure how the brand who did this ad called “Worlds Apart” could then do this one.

This week we’ve also seen a continued focus on diversity in media. Here is this story from CNN on how diversity is dominating the Box Office; Black Panther continues to break records; John Leguizamo announced he is expanding his studio to create more content for Latinos and there was an announcement that “One Day at a Time” was renewed for a third season after a social media campaign by fans.

Other news I am following this week include Intel’s diversity report, here is this from Portland “A School Board Member Complains to the Feds About the Quality of Education for Minority Kids in Portland,” this from USA Today titled “See Buffalo coach’s powerful words about diversity” and this guest commentary from Modern Healthcare on promoting diversity.

Congratulations to Tanzina Vega who has been named host of “The Takeaway.”  If you don’t follow her on Twitter, you should.

This week’s ICYMI is this analysis by Ronald Brownstein about diversity, an important read.

Photo by Rux Centea on Unsplash

2018 diversity conferences, Forbes, Uber, The Grammy Awards & more

Here is this list of 2018 diversity conferences and events that may be of interest. In addition, here is this great resource for blogging conferences, The National Diversity Council has this helpful calendar and there is this resource for Women in Technology conferences. These resources do not include industry specific events but if you need help in identifying events and conferences that will help you achieve your goals, send an email to monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

Forbes released its “first-ever list of America’s Best Employers for Diversity.” It partnered with Statista in looking at 250 U.S. employers across all industries.  Here is the list and more on the methodology.

Talking about firsts, Uber announced it has hired its first chief diversity officer. Bo Young Lee is joining from Marsh & McLennan. Recently Bernard Coleman III from Uber published this article on D&I with the focus on inclusion. More and more I see “inclusion” as one of the key themes of 2018.

Here is this story from The New York Times titled, “After #OscarsSoWhite, Hispanics Seek Their Hollywood Moment” focused on the lack of Hispanic representation in the entertainment industry.  

Also on the entertainment front, in advance of the Grammy Awards, the Recording Academy received accolades for diversity with acknowledgment that there is work to be done, just look at this study.  And then the show took place. Of course there was the issue of women representation. The Academy’s response? “Women need to step up.” This of course caused an uproar. Then Despacito was snubbed. Yes the #1 song of 2017. This article puts it into perspective. There is also this one. I think we all agree, and not to repeat myself, but there is so much work to be done. Update: Here are two more recommended reads, this from Leila Cobo at Billboard and this one from Marisa Arbona-Ruiz at NPR’s Alt.Latino.

Keeping with the music theme, here is this week’s ICYMI, last year Latino artists dominated ”YouTube’s top 10 music videos.” 

Photo by Ian Schneider on Unsplash

Two new diversity reports, Women’s March, CEO Action, Apple partners with Malala Fund, Oscars, RENEWPR & more

This week let’s start with two reports that prove (again) that if you want a more innovative and stronger performing company you need diversity.

Here is this report from McKinsey, which expands on the one released in 2015 and which says that, “The business case for diversity continues to be compelling and to have global relevance.”  

FastCompany wrote about this second report titled “Do Pro-Diversity Policies Improve Corporate Innovation?”. The big takeaway is that: “Companies that fulfill all nine positive diversity requirements announce an average of two extra products in any given year, which about doubles the average for a major company (those that tick fewer boxes are less innovative proportionally). Moreover, the researchers find that companies with pro-diversity policies were also more resilient in terms of innovation during the 2008 financial crisis.”

The Sunday shows did not focus much of their time on the Women’s March this year…let’s keep that in mind as you read this headline, How the Women’s March Is Turning Protesters Into Politicians.” 

As you may recall, last year the CEO Action Pledge for Diversity and Inclusion (CEO Action) was announced. Today it has more than 350 member companies representing 85 different industries. The group recently convened C-level executives to discuss their efforts, more information here

On the education front, Apple announced yesterday that it is partnering with the Malala Fund to support education for girls. According to the announcement, the partnership is “designed to enable the nonprofit to double the number of grants it offers and extend its funding programs to India and Latin America.”

Another story that got my attention is this one from the Washington Post titled “These kids started a book club for minority boys. It’s the most popular club in school.”  Finding and having the students’ read books that represent them is driving engagement. This is a great model and hope other schools, libraries and educational institutions take notice.

Congratulations to Ben Finzel and our friends at RENEWPR on their third year anniversary – read more here on how the team is celebrating this milestone.

Let’s close with two of my favorite recent videos:

  • This one in which Ava DuVernay used her speech at the Image Awards to celebrate others, bravo!
  • Then there’s this one, listen to this part and see Ricky Martin’s reaction:  “I seriously went very berserk on Dean Richards because you have to understand, when you’re part of a minority, and you don’t have a lot of role models in media, and you have a Ricky Martin that wherever you go in the world, it’s a good name to mention as a Puerto Rican, oh my goodness you feel related to him.”

Here’s hoping to see much more representation in media and that Ana Belava meets Ricky soon!

Photo by Mohamed Lammah on Unsplash

 

MLK Day of Service, Black Enterprise best companies for diversity, NALEO report, workforce diversity and more

Yesterday we celebrated Martin Luther King Day, a day which has become a national day of service. I was in New York and all the volunteer projects available at New York Cares were taken, which speaks to how for many this is not a day off. Here is some history on how in 1994 Representatives John Lewis and Harris Wofford made this a “day of action, not apathy.”  

This week Black Enterprise released its 2018 50 best companies for diversity. Here’s the list. In addition, here is some very interesting data from a recent BlackEnterprise.com study conducted by XpertHR of human resource professionals:

  • Approximately 25% of respondents said they were “very or extremely challenged by developing a culture of inclusion;”
  • 29% said they had similar difficulties in “recruiting a more diverse workforce” and
  • 33% cited challenges in “increasing minorities in leadership roles.”

Keeping with the workforce diversity theme, Matthew Glotzbach, CEO of Quizlet, published this piece outlining the four ways his team is increasing workforce diversity. This is very focused on recruitment, which is key, but it’s also important to remember that inclusion is critical for retention. Last year The Kapor Center for Social Impact released a report which found that “women, blacks and Latinos are far more likely to quit jobs in tech than white or Asian men.” Read more here.  Talking about diversity in tech, here is this from the San Francisco Chronicle titled “Rwanda is pushing gender diversity in tech. Should Silicon Valley take notes?”

Today the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) Educational Fund released its 2017 National Directory of Latino Elected Officials.  NALEO found that 6,600 Latinos are serving in elected office, up from 6,011 in 2013, an increase of nearly 10 percent.  Here is the release announcing the findings.

These past few months I’ve been impressed with how Google has celebrated the contributions of diverse individuals. This morning was no exception as a number of posts on Twitter alerted me to today’s Google Doodle commemorating Katy Jurado who, as Time Magazine states, was “a groundbreaking Mexican actress who built a Hollywood career without sacrificing her identity” on the day that would have been her 94th birthday.  She once said, “”I didn’t take all the films that were offered — just those with dignity.” Here is this interview of her talking about working with Grace Kelly.  One more Google story, according to Remezcla “Google Just Launched One of the Largest Digital Collections of Latino Art & History.”  Read more here.

Talking about representation, here is this piece in the New York Times titled “Guess Who’s Coming to ‘Peanuts.”  I see this as a great example of the importance of representation and it shows how to do things in a way that drives engagement without alienating other audiences.

Photo by James Motter on Unsplash

“Time’s Up” coalition, Hispanic identity, diversity in media and more

Happy 2018! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to subscribe. Please do not hesitate to send feedback, questions and ideas to monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

This weekend “Time’s Up” was unveiled, a coalition of 300 Actresses, Entertainment Execs “aimed at combating sexual harassment and misconduct in the workplace.” I think it is fantastic that this coalition is a result of the open letter sent by the Alianza Nacional de Campesinas supporting actors and actresses speaking out against sexual assault. According to this article, “organizers say they were inspired by the open letter to raise awareness and combat their own issues in the entertainment industry.” Also, here is a piece from last month about this topic. Here is also this from Melinda Gates. Oh and what a great way to start the year, Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo movement, pushing the button for NYE in Times Square, read more here.

I found this titledDiversity perception mismatch in US identified by new report.” This quote I believe is accurate not just for women but diverse candidates in general: “For most women in corporate America, the problem isn’t a glass ceiling—it’s a broken ladder,” said Andrea Ostby, a BCG partner and another coauthor of the report.

This morning Hoda Kotb was named permanent co-host of  the ‘Today’ show – read Brian Stelter’s piece here.  On a side note, one of my favorite newsletters, which is focused on media, is Reliable Sources and you can sign up to it here.

The Verge published  “A look back at the state of racial representation in Hollywood this year.”  Very interesting data and numbers to spend more time on.

I recently wrote about the Latinx debate and Pew Hispanic released this in December titled “Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away” with some interesting data. 

Here is this piece from JP Morgan Chase titled “Latino Entrepreneurs May Be the U.S. Economy’s Best Bet.” Here is this list from Vator for “Startup competitions with largest cash prizes for women and minority founders.”

If you are attending CES, try to attend Advancing Diversity.org’s event. More info here.

Finally, I want to close today with this list shared by Tanzina Vega and published by R.O. Kwon “46 Books By Women of Color to Read in 2018.” If you don’t follow Tanzina on twitter, you should.

Next week I’ll share some of the top 2018 events and conferences that you may consider attending – if you have any you want me to consider, email me at monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

Happy reading and here is to a 2018 where we can make a greater impact on diversity and inclusion.

Featured photo by Omar Lopez on Unsplash

#GivingTuesday and this week’s blog

If this is your first time reading my blog, thank you for reading. I invite you to 1) subscribe and 2) read previous posts. Here I share how this started.

As this is #GivingTuesday, I want to start by inviting you to give to PRxPR.org and support Puerto Rico. The organization is doing great work.

There is so much news focused on diversity that I am thinking of doing this twice a week. For now, let’s get started.

Yesterday everyone was talking about the Royal engagement. The way some media has covered it because of Meghan Merkel’s heritage is something I want to continue to follow. Now I must confess this story and headline horrified me but this piece and their joint interview, gave me hope. As you look at diversity, her background will be covered extensively. Here is this great piece I read today.

This weekend the New York Times received quick and significant backlash over this article.  Here is how the New York Times responded.  One recurring theme I saw on twitter is that the lack of diversity in the newsroom is one of the reasons this was published – the fact that Dean Baquet is black never seems to come up (at least not in my feeds). To read some of the backlash, read Soledad O’Brien’s twitter. BTW that same week the Times published this piece titled “Does race matter in America’s most diverse zip codes.” I think that the Times has been doing a pretty good job of covering diversity issues recently, which is why I was disappointed by this article. I also do agree that newsroom diversity is important, and as a recent study showed, there is much work to be done.

Here are some other stories from the week:

Business

Silicon Valley’s diversity efforts get mired in scandal

How Millennials Can Fix The Diversity Crisis In Silicon Valley

Private Equity Has Something To Add To The Diversity Discussion. Yes, Really

Ware: Encouraging first steps for diversity education

Marketing & Media

Pixar’s powerful stories aren’t being told by diverse voices, critics say

How Pixar’s ‘Coco’ became a huge box-office hit

Shonda Rhimes to Guest-Edit Hollywood Reporter Women in Entertainment Issue

BBC told it must ‘lead way’ on diversity

How Mitu Tells Stories to Reach Latino Millennials

African American Women in Media

Race driver Daniel Suarez is the face of NASCAR diversity push  

Issa Rae Talks New CoverGirl Melting Pout Metallics Lipstick Commercial

Education

How can California’s community colleges increase faculty diversity?

Students of color call on CU to better support diversity on Boulder campus

ICYM

Joseph Rodriguez’s El Barrio in the ’80s

Happy Thanksgiving week – this week’s diversity news recap

Happy Thanksgiving week. We moved from Mexico when I was ten years old and I honestly can’t remember if our first year in the United States we celebrated Thanksgiving. Like many immigrants, however, it became a Holiday that we embraced and celebrated. Today one of my favorite activities during Thanksgiving is volunteering – it combines being grateful with giving back. If you do a search you’ll find many ways different cultures and immigrants in the U.S. celebrate Thanksgiving. Here is this great piece from the New York Times published last year called The American Thanksgiving

Now for this week’s recap:

These two stories about Hollywood and diversity (or lack thereof) caught my attention: “Movie Biz Attempts to Grapple With Diversity Crisis” and “Neglecting the Latino Community Is Hollywood’s Multibillion-dollar Missed Opportunity.” Could Maria Contreras-Sweet help address these issues by taking over Weinstein and Company? This could really be a game-changer based on the proposed plan.

Forbes released its 30 under 30 list and this list is a celebration of the diversity of this new generation that will shape our future. The Forbes list is “an annual encyclopedia of creative disruption featuring 600 young stars in different industries.”  You can find it here: https://www.forbes.com/30-under-30/2018/#245324011aaf

People Magazine released its Sexiest Man Alive issue. We could argue for days if Blake Shelton is or is not (and it seems based on social media and some of the coverage, most don’t agree). So why mention here? Because the lack of diversity on the covers also garnered significant conversation. Here is a good piece on why this lack of diversity is problematic. Let’s hope magazines, and media in general, continue to recognize and reflect the diversity of the world we live in and celebrate the beauty of our diversity.

Here are additional stories from this past week:

The must read of the week

Mellody Hobson Says the Time for Corporate Diversity Is Now https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/14/business/dealbook/mellody-hobson-corporate-diversity.html

Business

‘I suppressed my Mexican heritage for fear of being labeled,’ says P&G chief marketer

Exclusive: Code2040 raises $5.6 million as it fights tech diversity backlash

Research: Men Get Credit for Voicing Ideas, but Not Problems. Women Don’t Get Credit for Either

Microsoft reports modest diversity gains, boosted by LinkedIn workforce and hiring initiatives

Workplace Diversity Gap Impacts LGBT & Disability Communities

330 CEOs have taken the ‘diversity pledge’ 

Diversity In The Workplace — The Cultural Shift For Creating Value 

Diversity Demands in Luxury

Education

Eighty Percent Of NC Teachers Are White. Here’s Why That Matters.

College to Name School for Late Journalist Gwen Ifill 

Diversity, Defined 

Medical School wins national diversity award 

Justice Dept. investigating Harvard over affirmative action policies

Marketing & Media

Diverse teams can help companies avoid advertising blunders 

Diversity and Inclusion: Rewriting the Rules for Marketing

Getting Personal at multicultural and diversity conference

Why are half of Latino immigrant TV characters portrayed as criminals?

Universal Music Partners With USC Think Tank to Boost Diversity in Music Industry

ICYMI

ELC to Black Corporate Leaders: Use Your Power to Impact Change

 

Who to follow:

@NALEO

@NAACP_LDF

@PRSAFoundation

Featured photo by Chris Lawton on Unsplash