MLK Day of Service, Black Enterprise best companies for diversity, NALEO report, workforce diversity and more

Yesterday we celebrated Martin Luther King Day, a day which has become a national day of service. I was in New York and all the volunteer projects available at New York Cares were taken, which speaks to how for many this is not a day off. Here is some history on how in 1994 Representatives John Lewis and Harris Wofford made this a “day of action, not apathy.”  

This week Black Enterprise released its 2018 50 best companies for diversity. Here’s the list. In addition, here is some very interesting data from a recent BlackEnterprise.com study conducted by XpertHR of human resource professionals:

  • Approximately 25% of respondents said they were “very or extremely challenged by developing a culture of inclusion;”
  • 29% said they had similar difficulties in “recruiting a more diverse workforce” and
  • 33% cited challenges in “increasing minorities in leadership roles.”

Keeping with the workforce diversity theme, Matthew Glotzbach, CEO of Quizlet, published this piece outlining the four ways his team is increasing workforce diversity. This is very focused on recruitment, which is key, but it’s also important to remember that inclusion is critical for retention. Last year The Kapor Center for Social Impact released a report which found that “women, blacks and Latinos are far more likely to quit jobs in tech than white or Asian men.” Read more here.  Talking about diversity in tech, here is this from the San Francisco Chronicle titled “Rwanda is pushing gender diversity in tech. Should Silicon Valley take notes?”

Today the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) Educational Fund released its 2017 National Directory of Latino Elected Officials.  NALEO found that 6,600 Latinos are serving in elected office, up from 6,011 in 2013, an increase of nearly 10 percent.  Here is the release announcing the findings.

These past few months I’ve been impressed with how Google has celebrated the contributions of diverse individuals. This morning was no exception as a number of posts on Twitter alerted me to today’s Google Doodle commemorating Katy Jurado who, as Time Magazine states, was “a groundbreaking Mexican actress who built a Hollywood career without sacrificing her identity” on the day that would have been her 94th birthday.  She once said, “”I didn’t take all the films that were offered — just those with dignity.” Here is this interview of her talking about working with Grace Kelly.  One more Google story, according to Remezcla “Google Just Launched One of the Largest Digital Collections of Latino Art & History.”  Read more here.

Talking about representation, here is this piece in the New York Times titled “Guess Who’s Coming to ‘Peanuts.”  I see this as a great example of the importance of representation and it shows how to do things in a way that drives engagement without alienating other audiences.

Photo by James Motter on Unsplash

The Golden Globes, why representation matters, Rebecca Aguilar launches Facebook group for Latina journalists, and more

Happy Tuesday. This week I have to start with the Golden Globes. I wasn’t sure on what to expect but was pleasantly surprised at how it became a “female empowerment event” as also described by Gamespot. There was of course Oprah Winfrey’s acceptance speech as the first black woman to receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award (link here if you missed it). There were other firsts including Sterling K. Brown as first African-American actor to win in the best actor in TV Drama and Aziz Ansari becoming the first Asian-American to win for best actor in a TV comedy. 

This year activists became the real stars of the Red Carpet, read more here. One of my favorite moments on the Red Carpet was this by Viola Davis. I also recommend reading  this piece from Jane Randel about #TimesUp. As she says “Changing the conversation is more complex and time-consuming, conceptually harder to understand, and oddly more discomforting to discuss because it forces us to look at our own behaviors.” 

Back to Oprah. One of the most important messages in her speech for me was that representation matters. This is why the conversation on diversity is so important. So let’s talk representation and start with this on Latinas in newsrooms. Monica Castillo, film writer for the New York Times Watching, shared these percentages of Latinas in newsrooms:

2.47%  – print newspapers

8.7% – TV news

4.2% – Radio.

Rebecca Aguilar launched a Facebook group for Latina journalists to create a community because as she says: “If no one else will open the doors for us, we will open them.” Bravo!

Now two examples of why representation also matters. 1) The New York Times identifying Rita Moreno as a guest in a photo caption. I get it that in red carpets things move quickly but really? Remember, she is one of the few entertainers to to have won an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony. 2) H&M. That’s all I’ll say. Read more here.  It is unacceptable that these mistakes are happening today and I do believe that if you had more diversity this would not happen.

Another story driving the conversation this week, Carrie Gracie resigning from her post at the BBC because of the gender gap pay.

Here is this shared by Tanzina Vega and a great read: “Women of Color Will Reclaim and Monetize Our Time.”  

Other recommended reads for this week: 7 CMOs Myths About Hispanic Marketing, “Gallup poll: Soccer closes in on big three as most popular U.S. spectator sport,” and  this Cindy Gallop profile (btw great content by MM.LAFLEUR).

And the ICYMI of the week: “New UC Irvine dean will be only woman of color to lead a top law school, university says.” Congratulations!

Be on the lookout for the list of conferences to attend, I’ll post those soon.

Photo by hannah grace on Unsplash

“Time’s Up” coalition, Hispanic identity, diversity in media and more

Happy 2018! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to subscribe. Please do not hesitate to send feedback, questions and ideas to monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

This weekend “Time’s Up” was unveiled, a coalition of 300 Actresses, Entertainment Execs “aimed at combating sexual harassment and misconduct in the workplace.” I think it is fantastic that this coalition is a result of the open letter sent by the Alianza Nacional de Campesinas supporting actors and actresses speaking out against sexual assault. According to this article, “organizers say they were inspired by the open letter to raise awareness and combat their own issues in the entertainment industry.” Also, here is a piece from last month about this topic. Here is also this from Melinda Gates. Oh and what a great way to start the year, Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo movement, pushing the button for NYE in Times Square, read more here.

I found this titledDiversity perception mismatch in US identified by new report.” This quote I believe is accurate not just for women but diverse candidates in general: “For most women in corporate America, the problem isn’t a glass ceiling—it’s a broken ladder,” said Andrea Ostby, a BCG partner and another coauthor of the report.

This morning Hoda Kotb was named permanent co-host of  the ‘Today’ show – read Brian Stelter’s piece here.  On a side note, one of my favorite newsletters, which is focused on media, is Reliable Sources and you can sign up to it here.

The Verge published  “A look back at the state of racial representation in Hollywood this year.”  Very interesting data and numbers to spend more time on.

I recently wrote about the Latinx debate and Pew Hispanic released this in December titled “Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away” with some interesting data. 

Here is this piece from JP Morgan Chase titled “Latino Entrepreneurs May Be the U.S. Economy’s Best Bet.” Here is this list from Vator for “Startup competitions with largest cash prizes for women and minority founders.”

If you are attending CES, try to attend Advancing Diversity.org’s event. More info here.

Finally, I want to close today with this list shared by Tanzina Vega and published by R.O. Kwon “46 Books By Women of Color to Read in 2018.” If you don’t follow Tanzina on twitter, you should.

Next week I’ll share some of the top 2018 events and conferences that you may consider attending – if you have any you want me to consider, email me at monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

Happy reading and here is to a 2018 where we can make a greater impact on diversity and inclusion.

Featured photo by Omar Lopez on Unsplash

The Latinx debate, a new Hollywood commission, the impact of diverse voters and more

Hispanic, Latino or Latinx?

This week I want to focus on the Latinx debate because of this opinion piece by Daniel Hernandez from this weekend’s Los Angeles Times and titled “The case against ‘Latinx’”. The piece has led to some interesting debates on twitter.  This  may be a new term for some, and there may be confusion in how, when or if to use it.

I find this debate fascinating for many reasons. You see for years I’ve been asked what term organizations should use – Hispanic or Latino. Let’s look at the history of the term Hispanic which was chosen by the U.S. government as the official term in the 70s, read more on the history here. Some disliked the term Hispanic but others did not connect to the word Latino. In 2002 Pew issued a report that showed how many Latinos identified more with their country of origin than to those terms. Here is this from CNN in 2004.  Two national organizations use Latino or Latin American in their names – National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials and League of United Latin American Citizens. The National Council of La Raza changed its name this year to Unidos US and NSHMBA changed its name to Prospanica. There is also MALDEF, which serves all Latinos in the U.S. but could be seen as only serving Mexican Americans because of its name. Several professional organizations use Hispanic in their name, i.e. NHJA, AHAASHPE, HNBA, etc.  Understanding that some individuals relate more to one term than the other is why I have always advised clients to use both intermittently.

Most recently Latinx has entered the debate. Let’s be clear, the terms “Hispanic” or “Latino” will not be replaced by the term “Latinx.” As Daniel does say, it is more relevant to some than to others, especially millennials. The beauty of our community is that we are not monolithic and this diversity is reflected in this debate.

After reading this great piece by NBC I better understand the importance of Latinx. I consider myself Latina, Hispanic, Mexican, MexTex (born in Mexico but raised in Texas). I will add Latinx to this list without eliminating the others and use it when it makes sense. One last point, I do hope that the LA Times gives space to the other side of the debate so that people can better understand why it’s important.

So to the question, should companies use Latinx? It depends when and how the term will be used (i.e. internally, externally, Latin America) but yes you should if 1) it’s relevant to your core audiences and 2) if you are focused on inclusion. Leaders should tap employees and experts who understand our community and their main audiences to help guide them. Carefully adding the term to their lexicon could help them connect to younger employees and consumers in the U.S. 

What is driving the conversation?

This week as expected we continue to see coverage around the #MeToo movement, including the announcement of a new Hollywood commission to address sexual harassment and led by Anita Hill.

Forbes profiled the new coalition created to quantify diversity and inclusion efforts in marketing and media. I think most of us agree this is a much needed initiative.

The Alabama election once again demonstrated the importance diverse communities will have in the future of our country. There has been extensive coverage about how black women helped the Democrats win the senate seat in Alabama. I do say “once again” because as this piece points out, this year we are seeing an increase in diverse candidates and voters.

Here is a good read from Steve Barrett about Barri Rafferty‘s promotion as it relates to diversity in PR – yes there is much work to be done.

Congratulations to the LATINA Style top 10 corporate executives of 2017, here is the list.

Congratulations to Maame Biney, she is the first African-American woman to qualify for the U.S. Olympics team in speed skating!

ICYMI

As we head into Christmas, here is the #ICYMI of the week, this uplifting piece on Anthony Anderson, a young opera singer.  

Wishing everyone a wonderful Holiday. Feliz Navidad.

Featured photo by James Motter on Unsplash

HP’s Reinvent Mindsets, Time Magazine, Golden Globes and bidding farewell to Maria Elena Salinas

Today’s blog post is different from previous ones, instead of a list of stories I’ll provide more context.

I recently had the opportunity to catch up with Mike Paul and he pointed me to this from HP. Powerful. Congratulations to HP for its “Reinvent Mindsets” effort to address unconscious bias, and for being named “Company of the Year for Diversity” by CIO Dive. Here is another great video from that same campaign, which seems timely, and this from the UK. 

Marketing & Media

The Time Magazine person of the year cover story came out a few days ago and it feels like weeks! As Tarana Burke, who created #MeToo said, this is a strong movement that continues to gain momentum. We saw more stories this week and I am sure that we will see many more. I salute Time Magazine for the diversity represented in the cover story, and for giving a voice to many not usually heard.

On the entertainment front, yesterday the Golden Globe nominations were announced and there was some backlash about the lack of diversity. Remezcla highlighted the “(few) Latinos Nominated for the 2018 Golden Globes“and yet Jack Rico had a different headline: “Latinos Reign Supreme At 2018 Golden Globe Award Nominations.” Read both pieces and let me know what you think in the comments section.

Now let’s talk Coco. I have not seen the film but have been following its success and coverage. Here is this piece by Sandra Gonzalez from CNN and this one from Ruben Navarrette. The movie has led the Box Office for three weeks, which of course will change this week with the release of Star Wars, which I think we can safely assume will break some records because of Carrie Fisher, as USA Today points out. Talking about Star Wars, following the premiere, here is one tweet from Jen Yamato that caught my attention.  The comments she received from her tweet are, let’s say interesting, but she is absolutely right, representation matters.

Talking about representation, Fashionista reported this week that “Diversity on magazine covers saw a slight decline in 2017,” you can read more here and there is this piece from the UK shared by Tanzina Vega about diversity in publishing.

Finally, this past week Maria Elena Salinas stepped down as co-anchor of Univision News after more than three decades.  Maria Elena and Jorge Ramos have been a part of my U.S. experience since we moved to this country. Like many others I thank her for her leadership and passion for our community.  I know she will continue to work diligently on our behalf. The week-long farewell was very moving – #GraciasMariaElena. Visit her website here to see what’s next. And as I mentioned before, this week Univision welcomes a new trailblazer, Ilia Calderon, the first Afro-Latina to anchor for one of the top five networks, regardless of language.

ICYMI

The United Nations declared December 18 International Migrant day, you can share your story or learn more here.

Don’t forget to share any stories you want me to include in the comments below or email me at monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

Featured photo by LinkedIn Sales Navigator on Unsplash

This week in diversity news – CES, Fortune’s Best Workplaces for Diversity and much more

CES announced its keynote speakers and, as many have pointed out, we have a problem. Gender Avenger published an “action alert” because of the lack of women as keynote speakers. Kristin Lemkau came up with a list of potential speakers. AdWeek, AdAge, Digiday and others wrote about the backlash. Karen Chupka responded on Twitter on behalf of CES and then in a statement said there was a limited pool of women CEOs.  Fast Company has coverage on how the pressure “isn’t letting up.” One note on the diversity front, CES named Baron Davis its CES ambassador but I think we all agree there is still an issue with lack of representation of women, African Americans and Latinos on the main stage.

As Cindy Gallop posted – “diversity drives innovation.” Watch this clip she shared here. I agree 100% with her: “when we change the optics, we have to change the content.”  Also visit http://toomanyguysonegirl.tumblr.com.

In 2016 a United Nations-based organization announced that none of its employees would participate in or host all-male panel discussions. It would be great to see keynote speakers take a similar stand. Most importantly, we need to continue to make organizations accountable. Thank you to all the leaders in the industry who have mobilized.

On another note, Fortune released the list of 100 Best Workplaces Diversity and you can find it here.

Following are a few additional stories I found this past week:

Business

Trickle diversity and century workforce

10 ways you’re getting workplace diversity wrong (and how to get it right)

Are Diversity, Equity And Inclusion Created Equal? Three Ways To Ensure One Doesn’t Trump the Other.

Building A Diverse Workforce In A Small Business

The Truth About Diversity — And Why It Matters

Executive of the Year: Katee Van Horn, GoDaddy

Why Diversity Matters in Your Workplace — and How to Achieve It

This Simple Chart Will Get You To Rethink Your Diversity Program

Marketing & Media

Ketchum’s Barri Rafferty Replaces Rob Flaherty As Global CEO

TV Azteca Sells U.S. Network Azteca América To HC2

Leading Ladies

Education

Brown University names diversity VP

‘I never had any teachers that looked like me.’ Fresno Unified aims for more diversity

Raytheon and Girl Scouts start computer science-“Cyber Challenge” partnership

ICYMI

Carmen de Lavallade is 86 and still the best dancer in the room

Feature photo by Samuel Zeller on Unsplash

The #MeToo Movement

Like many others I am grateful for the #MeToo movement and celebrate the women and men coming forward as well as the journalists bringing light to these stories.

This tweet from Chloe Angyal also describes how I feel reading all these reports and stories:

It’s hard to watch this all unfold without grieving the news that was never reported, books never written, companies never founded, movies never produced, campaigns never run, dreams never pursued, the sheer loss of human contributions caused by harassment. It’s stunning.”  

I also think of all the women who who may not have a recourse to report this abuse of power, just read this piece from the Huffington Post or this open letter from Latina Farmworkers.

What’s Next?

As more victims speak up, we need to ask “what’s next?” as Jane Randel from Karp Randel does in this piece.

Here are a few of the millions of stories and opinion pieces on the topic. From my Google search: About 16,100,000 results (0.36 seconds)”. The first is an editorial in USA Today but the rest are recommended reads and I am not including any that focus on any specific case. I know that unfortunately there is much more to come but I look forward to seeing leaders evaluate their companies and organizations and taking some of the steps Jane and other experts recommend.

Recent Coverage

The sexual harassment reckoning

A large majority of Americans say there is sexual harassment on the job

The (Misguided) Reasons People Doubt Sexual Harassment Victims

How to talk to kids about sexual harassment

The Insidious Economic Impact of Sexual Harassment

From Weinstein to Lauer: A timeline of 2017’s sexual harassment scandals

These industries have the most reported instances of sexual harassment

Sexual harassment debate advances an issue — and confuses it

After sexual harassment allegations, is there a cultural shift in the workplace?

Anita Hill: ‘Washington cannot lead the country’ in addressing sexual harassment

Featured photo by Mihai Surdu on Unsplash.

#GivingTuesday and this week’s blog

If this is your first time reading my blog, thank you for reading. I invite you to 1) subscribe and 2) read previous posts. Here I share how this started.

As this is #GivingTuesday, I want to start by inviting you to give to PRxPR.org and support Puerto Rico. The organization is doing great work.

There is so much news focused on diversity that I am thinking of doing this twice a week. For now, let’s get started.

Yesterday everyone was talking about the Royal engagement. The way some media has covered it because of Meghan Merkel’s heritage is something I want to continue to follow. Now I must confess this story and headline horrified me but this piece and their joint interview, gave me hope. As you look at diversity, her background will be covered extensively. Here is this great piece I read today.

This weekend the New York Times received quick and significant backlash over this article.  Here is how the New York Times responded.  One recurring theme I saw on twitter is that the lack of diversity in the newsroom is one of the reasons this was published – the fact that Dean Baquet is black never seems to come up (at least not in my feeds). To read some of the backlash, read Soledad O’Brien’s twitter. BTW that same week the Times published this piece titled “Does race matter in America’s most diverse zip codes.” I think that the Times has been doing a pretty good job of covering diversity issues recently, which is why I was disappointed by this article. I also do agree that newsroom diversity is important, and as a recent study showed, there is much work to be done.

Here are some other stories from the week:

Business

Silicon Valley’s diversity efforts get mired in scandal

How Millennials Can Fix The Diversity Crisis In Silicon Valley

Private Equity Has Something To Add To The Diversity Discussion. Yes, Really

Ware: Encouraging first steps for diversity education

Marketing & Media

Pixar’s powerful stories aren’t being told by diverse voices, critics say

How Pixar’s ‘Coco’ became a huge box-office hit

Shonda Rhimes to Guest-Edit Hollywood Reporter Women in Entertainment Issue

BBC told it must ‘lead way’ on diversity

How Mitu Tells Stories to Reach Latino Millennials

African American Women in Media

Race driver Daniel Suarez is the face of NASCAR diversity push  

Issa Rae Talks New CoverGirl Melting Pout Metallics Lipstick Commercial

Education

How can California’s community colleges increase faculty diversity?

Students of color call on CU to better support diversity on Boulder campus

ICYM

Joseph Rodriguez’s El Barrio in the ’80s

Happy Thanksgiving week – this week’s diversity news recap

Happy Thanksgiving week. We moved from Mexico when I was ten years old and I honestly can’t remember if our first year in the United States we celebrated Thanksgiving. Like many immigrants, however, it became a Holiday that we embraced and celebrated. Today one of my favorite activities during Thanksgiving is volunteering – it combines being grateful with giving back. If you do a search you’ll find many ways different cultures and immigrants in the U.S. celebrate Thanksgiving. Here is this great piece from the New York Times published last year called The American Thanksgiving

Now for this week’s recap:

These two stories about Hollywood and diversity (or lack thereof) caught my attention: “Movie Biz Attempts to Grapple With Diversity Crisis” and “Neglecting the Latino Community Is Hollywood’s Multibillion-dollar Missed Opportunity.” Could Maria Contreras-Sweet help address these issues by taking over Weinstein and Company? This could really be a game-changer based on the proposed plan.

Forbes released its 30 under 30 list and this list is a celebration of the diversity of this new generation that will shape our future. The Forbes list is “an annual encyclopedia of creative disruption featuring 600 young stars in different industries.”  You can find it here: https://www.forbes.com/30-under-30/2018/#245324011aaf

People Magazine released its Sexiest Man Alive issue. We could argue for days if Blake Shelton is or is not (and it seems based on social media and some of the coverage, most don’t agree). So why mention here? Because the lack of diversity on the covers also garnered significant conversation. Here is a good piece on why this lack of diversity is problematic. Let’s hope magazines, and media in general, continue to recognize and reflect the diversity of the world we live in and celebrate the beauty of our diversity.

Here are additional stories from this past week:

The must read of the week

Mellody Hobson Says the Time for Corporate Diversity Is Now https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/14/business/dealbook/mellody-hobson-corporate-diversity.html

Business

‘I suppressed my Mexican heritage for fear of being labeled,’ says P&G chief marketer

Exclusive: Code2040 raises $5.6 million as it fights tech diversity backlash

Research: Men Get Credit for Voicing Ideas, but Not Problems. Women Don’t Get Credit for Either

Microsoft reports modest diversity gains, boosted by LinkedIn workforce and hiring initiatives

Workplace Diversity Gap Impacts LGBT & Disability Communities

330 CEOs have taken the ‘diversity pledge’ 

Diversity In The Workplace — The Cultural Shift For Creating Value 

Diversity Demands in Luxury

Education

Eighty Percent Of NC Teachers Are White. Here’s Why That Matters.

College to Name School for Late Journalist Gwen Ifill 

Diversity, Defined 

Medical School wins national diversity award 

Justice Dept. investigating Harvard over affirmative action policies

Marketing & Media

Diverse teams can help companies avoid advertising blunders 

Diversity and Inclusion: Rewriting the Rules for Marketing

Getting Personal at multicultural and diversity conference

Why are half of Latino immigrant TV characters portrayed as criminals?

Universal Music Partners With USC Think Tank to Boost Diversity in Music Industry

ICYMI

ELC to Black Corporate Leaders: Use Your Power to Impact Change

 

Who to follow:

@NALEO

@NAACP_LDF

@PRSAFoundation

Featured photo by Chris Lawton on Unsplash

This week’s diversity and inclusion top stories

I recently had the opportunity to see John Leguizamo’s ‘Latin History for Morons’ at Studio 54 – one of my favorite theaters on Broadway. One of the points he makes is that many of our stories are not in history books and now more than ever we need to tell all  of our stories. So if you have a chance, go see it, you’ll laugh and learn. https://broadwaydirect.com/john-leguizamo-latin-history-morons/.

That same weekend I watched Marshall, a movie I had not heard much about but which is fantastic: Marshall’ movie review: A different kind of superhero story. 

Before sharing some of the top stories for the week, let me take this opportunity to congratulate award-winning journalist Ilia Calderon who has been named co-anchor of Univision’s evening news with Jorge Ramos. She will be the first Afro-Latina to anchor the evening news for a leading networks in the country, regardless of language. Bravo! Here is one of my favorite pieces written about the announcement: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ilia-calderon-noticiero-univision_us_5a0345f5e4b03deac08a8e39.

Here is a clip from Univision with Maria Elena, Ilia and Jorge (in Spanish): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Jq61RJttmg

The featured photo is by Chris Barbalis on Unsplash. 

The must read of the week

Apple releases first diversity report under new VP of diversity and inclusion

Other headlines

Business

The One Philosophical Difference That Sets Millennials Apart In Workplace Diversity

11 men and 1 woman on management team? No need for diversity report 

Black on Bay Street: Hadiya Roderique had it all. But still could not fit in

Katherine Johnson building opens at NASA Langley Research Center 

Education

Anti-bias lessons help preschoolers hold up a mirror to diversity 

Gyrl Wonder Inspires Youth to Shine When the World May Want to Dim Their Light 

Girl Scouts Launches Initiative to Put 2.5 Million girls through STEM Programs by 2025

Google Grants Non-Profit $1 Million To Expose Black Boys To Tech Careers 

Marketing & Media

New Adobe Study Highlights Diversity Issues in the Advertising Industry 

Naomi Campbell: ‘Diversity must not be seen as a trend’

New Diversity Org, The Creative Thread Foundation, Has Few Women On Its Board

How One Film Festival Is Remembering Early Hollywood’s Asian-American Stars

Marvel gave indigenous director Taika Waititi its worst franchise in

CBS Diversity Comedy Showcase Has Been a Racist, Sexist, Homophobic Mess for Years, Participants Say

Politics

Democrats’ Diversity Paid Off Across the Country in Key Elections

ICYMI

Women of Color Have High Ambition, But Little Help

Who to follow

https://twitter.com/lulac

https://twitter.com/HRC

https://twitter.com/elcinfo

https://twitter.com/TheRoot