Leading with inclusion, I.D.E.A.S. Summit powered by Forbes, PayScale study, Macy’s new line, congratulations to Policy Wisdom & more

I’ve talked about 2018 being the year of inclusion. This piece in Fast Company focuses on inclusion and provides good recommendations. And in this recent post Glenn Llopis focuses on inclusion and actually speaks of having the D&I role in corporate strategy vs. HR. I agree with Glenn that we need to rethink the approach to diversity and see how this could have a greater impact. I also agree 100% that by rethinking diversity you will drive growth. However, I would argue that HR still plays an important role and key to that is 1) hiring the right people and 2) investing in career development and mapping. Learn from companies like Estée Lauder which is leading with inclusion and by organizations like She Runs It which are creating programs to have a greater impact.

On another topic – recruitment – here is this interesting study from PayScale that says that relying too heavily on referrals can create a less diverse workforce. This speaks to the point of making an effort. Yes referrals may be one way to find the right candidate, but make sure all employees are empowered to provide referrals. However, also look at other ways to attract talent including partnering with the right organizations and going to colleges and universities that serve diverse communities.

There is much work to be done as it relates to diversity across industries and the reports, programs and efforts being launched should start to move the needle. One such program focused on the entertainment industry was recently announced by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and filmmaker Ava DuVernay, read more here

Another recommended read this week is this Digiday piece titled “In the #MeToo era, agency bosses worry diversity hiring will lead to tokenism.”  Read to the end, with some good examples on how to recruit, retain and create a pipeline of women leaders.

Other headlines include Macy’s new line which launched to mixed reviews; Forbes is hosting the inaugural I.D.E.A.S. Summit in May; Microsoft hired a Chief Diversity Officer...and IBM is suing; US Hispanic Chamber of Commerce head stepping down amid “amid allegations of financial impropriety and sexual harassment;” and of course the Olympics.

Congratulations to our friends at Latina-led Policy Wisdom for their eight years of “growth and evolution. Watch this video about their work – very proud of the team including founder @anaritagon

ICYMI, President Barack Obama’s and former First Lady Michelle Obama’s portraits were unveiled at the National Portrait Gallery this week. This by  Renée Grahamthink provides one of the best perspectives.

Photo by Doug Swinson on Unsplash

Black History Month, Super Bowl, #3percentSB, Being Black in PR & more

This month we celebrate Black History Month and if you want to learn more about this celebration visit the History Channel’s site. Many companies focus this month in celebrating the contributions of African Americans both with internal and external audiences but looking at the demographics you would think it should be more than a month.  I do agree that this is a great opportunity to engage and celebrate but be sure you engage with your resource/affinity groups and with leaders who understand the community in building programs that are not just a month-long celebration.

This is also an opportunity to look at the present and future, as well as the impact of the community. From black purchasing power, to the small business impact, to the importance of the black vote as seen in the Alabama election and to the entertainment impact, with the most recent example being  Black Panther. If you missed the red carpet premiere, as this article states, it was a glorious celebration.

Yet when it comes to celebrating diversity, many companies still get it wrong both internally and externally. Look at the RAM Trucks Super Bowl commercial, and yes the estate approved the use of Dr. Martin Luther King’s voice, but it goes back to the question of representation. Did the brand or advertising team have any diversity on the team? Did they have colleagues who felt empowered to flag that there may be an issue? This is why it’s important. Your intent may be good, and I am sure it was, but if you do not understand the audience or the sensitivities, you are not being authentic and will have bigger issues to manage. The negative response on social was swift and reflected overall in the coverage in outlets including the New York Times, ABC and CBS to name a few. This is from AdAge on the brand defending the ad.

Staying on the Super Bowl topic, if you did not follow the 3 Percent Conference Super Bowl Tweetup, you should have. In fact all marketers should do a search using the #3percentSB hashtag, you will find great insights. Participants applied the three percent test to the commercials, which is:
1. Is there a woman?
2. Is she defying stereotypes?
3. Is she the hero?

I did watch each commercial differently this year as I followed the Tweetup. 

This past week PRWeek released this fantastic video on “Being Black in PR.” Watch it. Share it. Use it internally. I could relate to so many of the points made and congratulate Perry Simpson and everyone who worked on it and contributed their voice to a very important resource.

It seems there is a weekly report issued on why diversity matters, here is this one from Harvard Business Review titled “How and Where Diversity Drives Financial Performance.” It includes some great data and, as it says, hopefully motivation for increasing diversity. It found that “the most-diverse enterprises were also the most innovative, as measured by the freshness of their revenue mix.”  And then there is also what seems like a weekly report regarding the lack of diversity in an industry or sector, here is this one titled “Academic Medicine Needs More Women Leaders.”

This week’s ICYMI story is one that hopefully inspires you. Titled “Code Breakers: Computer science has a girl problem and Reshma Saujani MPP 1999 is fixing it,” the piece profiles Reshma Saujani and Girls Who Code, which has taught coding to more than 40,000 girls.

Finally, last week I shared this list of upcoming conferences which will be updated periodically. If there are other events to include or to highlight, please do not hesitate to send my way.  

Photo by LinkedIn Sales Navigator on Unsplash

2018 diversity conferences, Forbes, Uber, The Grammy Awards & more

Here is this list of 2018 diversity conferences and events that may be of interest. In addition, here is this great resource for blogging conferences, The National Diversity Council has this helpful calendar and there is this resource for Women in Technology conferences. These resources do not include industry specific events but if you need help in identifying events and conferences that will help you achieve your goals, send an email to monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

Forbes released its “first-ever list of America’s Best Employers for Diversity.” It partnered with Statista in looking at 250 U.S. employers across all industries.  Here is the list and more on the methodology.

Talking about firsts, Uber announced it has hired its first chief diversity officer. Bo Young Lee is joining from Marsh & McLennan. Recently Bernard Coleman III from Uber published this article on D&I with the focus on inclusion. More and more I see “inclusion” as one of the key themes of 2018.

Here is this story from The New York Times titled, “After #OscarsSoWhite, Hispanics Seek Their Hollywood Moment” focused on the lack of Hispanic representation in the entertainment industry.  

Also on the entertainment front, in advance of the Grammy Awards, the Recording Academy received accolades for diversity with acknowledgment that there is work to be done, just look at this study.  And then the show took place. Of course there was the issue of women representation. The Academy’s response? “Women need to step up.” This of course caused an uproar. Then Despacito was snubbed. Yes the #1 song of 2017. This article puts it into perspective. There is also this one. I think we all agree, and not to repeat myself, but there is so much work to be done. Update: Here are two more recommended reads, this from Leila Cobo at Billboard and this one from Marisa Arbona-Ruiz at NPR’s Alt.Latino.

Keeping with the music theme, here is this week’s ICYMI, last year Latino artists dominated ”YouTube’s top 10 music videos.” 

Photo by Ian Schneider on Unsplash

Two new diversity reports, Women’s March, CEO Action, Apple partners with Malala Fund, Oscars, RENEWPR & more

This week let’s start with two reports that prove (again) that if you want a more innovative and stronger performing company you need diversity.

Here is this report from McKinsey, which expands on the one released in 2015 and which says that, “The business case for diversity continues to be compelling and to have global relevance.”  

FastCompany wrote about this second report titled “Do Pro-Diversity Policies Improve Corporate Innovation?”. The big takeaway is that: “Companies that fulfill all nine positive diversity requirements announce an average of two extra products in any given year, which about doubles the average for a major company (those that tick fewer boxes are less innovative proportionally). Moreover, the researchers find that companies with pro-diversity policies were also more resilient in terms of innovation during the 2008 financial crisis.”

The Sunday shows did not focus much of their time on the Women’s March this year…let’s keep that in mind as you read this headline, How the Women’s March Is Turning Protesters Into Politicians.” 

As you may recall, last year the CEO Action Pledge for Diversity and Inclusion (CEO Action) was announced. Today it has more than 350 member companies representing 85 different industries. The group recently convened C-level executives to discuss their efforts, more information here

On the education front, Apple announced yesterday that it is partnering with the Malala Fund to support education for girls. According to the announcement, the partnership is “designed to enable the nonprofit to double the number of grants it offers and extend its funding programs to India and Latin America.”

Another story that got my attention is this one from the Washington Post titled “These kids started a book club for minority boys. It’s the most popular club in school.”  Finding and having the students’ read books that represent them is driving engagement. This is a great model and hope other schools, libraries and educational institutions take notice.

Congratulations to Ben Finzel and our friends at RENEWPR on their third year anniversary – read more here on how the team is celebrating this milestone.

Let’s close with two of my favorite recent videos:

  • This one in which Ava DuVernay used her speech at the Image Awards to celebrate others, bravo!
  • Then there’s this one, listen to this part and see Ricky Martin’s reaction:  “I seriously went very berserk on Dean Richards because you have to understand, when you’re part of a minority, and you don’t have a lot of role models in media, and you have a Ricky Martin that wherever you go in the world, it’s a good name to mention as a Puerto Rican, oh my goodness you feel related to him.”

Here’s hoping to see much more representation in media and that Ana Belava meets Ricky soon!

Photo by Mohamed Lammah on Unsplash

 

MLK Day of Service, Black Enterprise best companies for diversity, NALEO report, workforce diversity and more

Yesterday we celebrated Martin Luther King Day, a day which has become a national day of service. I was in New York and all the volunteer projects available at New York Cares were taken, which speaks to how for many this is not a day off. Here is some history on how in 1994 Representatives John Lewis and Harris Wofford made this a “day of action, not apathy.”  

This week Black Enterprise released its 2018 50 best companies for diversity. Here’s the list. In addition, here is some very interesting data from a recent BlackEnterprise.com study conducted by XpertHR of human resource professionals:

  • Approximately 25% of respondents said they were “very or extremely challenged by developing a culture of inclusion;”
  • 29% said they had similar difficulties in “recruiting a more diverse workforce” and
  • 33% cited challenges in “increasing minorities in leadership roles.”

Keeping with the workforce diversity theme, Matthew Glotzbach, CEO of Quizlet, published this piece outlining the four ways his team is increasing workforce diversity. This is very focused on recruitment, which is key, but it’s also important to remember that inclusion is critical for retention. Last year The Kapor Center for Social Impact released a report which found that “women, blacks and Latinos are far more likely to quit jobs in tech than white or Asian men.” Read more here.  Talking about diversity in tech, here is this from the San Francisco Chronicle titled “Rwanda is pushing gender diversity in tech. Should Silicon Valley take notes?”

Today the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) Educational Fund released its 2017 National Directory of Latino Elected Officials.  NALEO found that 6,600 Latinos are serving in elected office, up from 6,011 in 2013, an increase of nearly 10 percent.  Here is the release announcing the findings.

These past few months I’ve been impressed with how Google has celebrated the contributions of diverse individuals. This morning was no exception as a number of posts on Twitter alerted me to today’s Google Doodle commemorating Katy Jurado who, as Time Magazine states, was “a groundbreaking Mexican actress who built a Hollywood career without sacrificing her identity” on the day that would have been her 94th birthday.  She once said, “”I didn’t take all the films that were offered — just those with dignity.” Here is this interview of her talking about working with Grace Kelly.  One more Google story, according to Remezcla “Google Just Launched One of the Largest Digital Collections of Latino Art & History.”  Read more here.

Talking about representation, here is this piece in the New York Times titled “Guess Who’s Coming to ‘Peanuts.”  I see this as a great example of the importance of representation and it shows how to do things in a way that drives engagement without alienating other audiences.

Photo by James Motter on Unsplash

The Golden Globes, why representation matters, Rebecca Aguilar launches Facebook group for Latina journalists, and more

Happy Tuesday. This week I have to start with the Golden Globes. I wasn’t sure on what to expect but was pleasantly surprised at how it became a “female empowerment event” as also described by Gamespot. There was of course Oprah Winfrey’s acceptance speech as the first black woman to receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award (link here if you missed it). There were other firsts including Sterling K. Brown as first African-American actor to win in the best actor in TV Drama and Aziz Ansari becoming the first Asian-American to win for best actor in a TV comedy. 

This year activists became the real stars of the Red Carpet, read more here. One of my favorite moments on the Red Carpet was this by Viola Davis. I also recommend reading  this piece from Jane Randel about #TimesUp. As she says “Changing the conversation is more complex and time-consuming, conceptually harder to understand, and oddly more discomforting to discuss because it forces us to look at our own behaviors.” 

Back to Oprah. One of the most important messages in her speech for me was that representation matters. This is why the conversation on diversity is so important. So let’s talk representation and start with this on Latinas in newsrooms. Monica Castillo, film writer for the New York Times Watching, shared these percentages of Latinas in newsrooms:

2.47%  – print newspapers

8.7% – TV news

4.2% – Radio.

Rebecca Aguilar launched a Facebook group for Latina journalists to create a community because as she says: “If no one else will open the doors for us, we will open them.” Bravo!

Now two examples of why representation also matters. 1) The New York Times identifying Rita Moreno as a guest in a photo caption. I get it that in red carpets things move quickly but really? Remember, she is one of the few entertainers to to have won an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony. 2) H&M. That’s all I’ll say. Read more here.  It is unacceptable that these mistakes are happening today and I do believe that if you had more diversity this would not happen.

Another story driving the conversation this week, Carrie Gracie resigning from her post at the BBC because of the gender gap pay.

Here is this shared by Tanzina Vega and a great read: “Women of Color Will Reclaim and Monetize Our Time.”  

Other recommended reads for this week: 7 CMOs Myths About Hispanic Marketing, “Gallup poll: Soccer closes in on big three as most popular U.S. spectator sport,” and  this Cindy Gallop profile (btw great content by MM.LAFLEUR).

And the ICYMI of the week: “New UC Irvine dean will be only woman of color to lead a top law school, university says.” Congratulations!

Be on the lookout for the list of conferences to attend, I’ll post those soon.

Photo by hannah grace on Unsplash

“Time’s Up” coalition, Hispanic identity, diversity in media and more

Happy 2018! Thank you for reading and don’t forget to subscribe. Please do not hesitate to send feedback, questions and ideas to monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

This weekend “Time’s Up” was unveiled, a coalition of 300 Actresses, Entertainment Execs “aimed at combating sexual harassment and misconduct in the workplace.” I think it is fantastic that this coalition is a result of the open letter sent by the Alianza Nacional de Campesinas supporting actors and actresses speaking out against sexual assault. According to this article, “organizers say they were inspired by the open letter to raise awareness and combat their own issues in the entertainment industry.” Also, here is a piece from last month about this topic. Here is also this from Melinda Gates. Oh and what a great way to start the year, Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo movement, pushing the button for NYE in Times Square, read more here.

I found this titledDiversity perception mismatch in US identified by new report.” This quote I believe is accurate not just for women but diverse candidates in general: “For most women in corporate America, the problem isn’t a glass ceiling—it’s a broken ladder,” said Andrea Ostby, a BCG partner and another coauthor of the report.

This morning Hoda Kotb was named permanent co-host of  the ‘Today’ show – read Brian Stelter’s piece here.  On a side note, one of my favorite newsletters, which is focused on media, is Reliable Sources and you can sign up to it here.

The Verge published  “A look back at the state of racial representation in Hollywood this year.”  Very interesting data and numbers to spend more time on.

I recently wrote about the Latinx debate and Pew Hispanic released this in December titled “Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away” with some interesting data. 

Here is this piece from JP Morgan Chase titled “Latino Entrepreneurs May Be the U.S. Economy’s Best Bet.” Here is this list from Vator for “Startup competitions with largest cash prizes for women and minority founders.”

If you are attending CES, try to attend Advancing Diversity.org’s event. More info here.

Finally, I want to close today with this list shared by Tanzina Vega and published by R.O. Kwon “46 Books By Women of Color to Read in 2018.” If you don’t follow Tanzina on twitter, you should.

Next week I’ll share some of the top 2018 events and conferences that you may consider attending – if you have any you want me to consider, email me at monica@talkingdiversity.blog.

Happy reading and here is to a 2018 where we can make a greater impact on diversity and inclusion.

Featured photo by Omar Lopez on Unsplash