The business case for diversity, L’Oréal, Nike, Amplify, DirecTV, diversity in finance, groups driving engagement and more

I want to thank those who have added names to the list of Latino sources for media, we are now up to 90. The list is open for anyone who wants to make additions.

We continue to see studies that speak to the business case for diversity. Here is this from Harvard Business Review which finds that “Diversity significantly improves financial performance on measures such as profitable investments at the individual portfolio-company level and overall fund returns.” In addition to the findings, it includes “evidenced-based recommendations.”

Other good reads this week, L’Oréal shared some diversity best practices as a member of the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion, read this from the Company’s CEO. There are many debates on how to fight bias and promote diversity. Here is this from Fast Company. Forbes published this titled  “Seven Ways To Address The Diversity Problem In Finance.” Here is this piece titled “Inside Nike’s purge: More than a #MeToo moment,” and this: “U.S. Bus Tour Promotes Unconscious-Bias Discussion.”

If you try to engage diverse audiences, you know there are many groups and organizations focused on driving engagement. For example, Ben Finzel created a LGBTQ networking group in DC, read more here. Christy Haubegger, who founded Latina Magazine, launched “the most comprehensive site for underrepresented writers” and it is called Amplify, learn more here.   Also, DirecTV and Reese Witherspoon announced a new production deal.

ICYMI here is this great piece by Esmeralda Bermudez where she asked people how language has shaped their world. Having moved to the U.S. when I was ten, I will always be grateful to my mother for ensuring we spoke Spanish. Being bilingual has enriched me personally and opened many doors professionally.

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

 

Let’s crowdsource a list of Latinos for Sunday news shows and media in general

Earlier this week I posted a blog with 50 Latinos that TV bookers and media in general could tap to talk about the Hispanic experience. Thank you for the comments and feedback, which tells me this was a much needed starting point – and this is a starting point. Enrique Acevedo said “We can all benefit from more diversity, not only of gender and race, but age and points of view as well.” Of course I agree but as I told him that doesn’t mean having the conversation of the lack of Latinos on Sunday and news shows is not important. The elections this year proves – and in particular this week in New York –  that age and gender diversity are key too.

Mariela Azcuy recommended making this a public list that others could add to – and others agreed. So here is a link to a document that you can help add names to and I’ll post an update next week. Have others to add? Go! http://bit.ly/LatinoSources

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Dear TV bookers: Here’s a list of 50 Latinos

For many Latinos who follow Sunday and political shows closely it is extremely frustrating to see the lack of Hispanic representation in media. This is not new – here is this article from last year and there is this Media Matters report. The issue came to a head this week because as the top story in the country is about immigration, the Sunday shows only had one Latino headliner. This not only resulted in headlines but also in a number of twitter conversations including this one and this one. One of my top tweets thus far (and if you follow me you know I am active on twitter) was recommending to Brian Stelter that he host a segment focused on the lack of Latinos on Sunday shows (and hope to see this soon!)

Here is the thing – and read this also from Media Matters on the topic – Latinos should be invited not only to talk about immigration but to address any and all issues. Latinos represent close to 18 percent of the country, we are very diverse, speak English or Spanish or both or more than two languages. We care about education, the economy, entrepreneurship, healthcare and much, much more. There are conservative, moderate and progressive. We are very diverse. So why are we not at the table?

I have had many conversations on this issue but if I’ve learned something these past few years is that it is not enough to complain or talk about an issue – you need to do something. So here is my small contribution – a list of 50 Latinos that could be invited to these shows. Not all to talk about immigration, some on business or other issues. I hope any and all TV booker can use this list for morning shows, Sunday shows or any news segment. These are just a select 50, trust me locally and nationally there are many more. There are also many in other fields from healthcare, to marketing to entertainment not included but that may be a future post. I also have not added elected officials because you can find them by reaching out to NALEO, CHCI and CHLI. Of course feel free to add any other names to the comments section below.

Finally, this Sunday, as John Oliver covered on his show this past weekend, Mexico elects a new president. So bookers keep in mind that there are many very knowledgeable  individuals you can invite to your shows including former Ambassador Tony Garza, Dallas Morning News reporter Alfredo Corchado, Jorge Ramos or Enrique Acevedo from Univision, Maria Elena Salinas who is an independent award-winning journalist, Laura Martinez from CNET or Leon Krauze who is a Univision anchor in Los Angeles who moderated a Mexican presidential debate.

Trust me there are many knowledgeable, eloquent Hispanics who would be great sources for your shows. As this is not an all encompassing list but hopefully helps demonstrate why there is no reason for a lack of representation.

Journalists (this list is just a few – NAHJ is a resource to identify more).

Tanzina Vega Host, The Takeaway https://twitter.com/tanzinavega
Suzanne Gamboa NBC https://twitter.com/SuzGamboa
Alfredo Corchado Dallas Morning News https://twitter.com/ajcorchado
Maria Elena Salinas Independent https://twitter.com/MariaESalinas
Maria Hinojosa Pres-Futuro Media Group; anchor & EP @LatinoUSA @NPR, https://twitter.com/Maria_Hinojosa
Jorge Ramos Univision https://twitter.com/jorgeramosnews
Enrique Acevedo Univision https://twitter.com/Enrique_Acevedo
Leon Krauze Univision https://twitter.com/LeonKrauze
Laura Martinez CNET https://twitter.com/miblogestublog
Jose Diaz-Balart Telemundo https://twitter.com/jdbalart
Mariana Atencio MSNBC https://twitter.com/marianaatencio
Lulu Garcia-Navarro NPR https://twitter.com/lourdesgnavarro
Julio Ricardo Varela In The Thick https://twitter.com/julito77
Olivia Tallet Houston Chronicle https://twitter.com/oliviaptallet
Charo Enriquez New York Times https://twitter.com/charohenriquez?lang=en
Veronica Villafañe Forbes https://twitter.com/veronicav

Hispanic-serving organizations (the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda also is a resource to identify others).

Janet Murguia NCLR https://twitter.com/JMurguia_Unidos
Arturo Vargas NALEO https://twitter.com/ArturoNALEO
Sindy Benavides LULAC https://twitter.com/SindyBenavides
Fernand Fernandez USHCC https://ushcc.com/about/team/
Thomas A. Saenz MALDEF https://twitter.com/ThomasASaenz
María Teresa Kumar Voto Latino https://twitter.com/MariaTeresa1
Ana Valdez Latino Donor Collaborative https://twitter.com/LDCAna1
Alex Nogales National Hispanic Media Coalition https://twitter.com/alexcnogales
Cid Wilson HACR https://twitter.com/CidWilson

Politics/pundits

Ana Navarro CNN contributor https://twitter.com/ananavarro
Maria Cardona CNN Commentator/

Latinovations

https://twitter.com/MariaTCardona
Victoria M. DeFrancesco Soto Political scientist https://twitter.com/DrVMDS
Leslie Sanchez CBS News contributor https://twitter.com/LeslieSanchez
Ruben Navarrette Navarrette Nation podcast https://twitter.com/RubenNavarrette
Laura Hernandez Pescador https://twitter.com/Laurajhv
Matt Barreto Latino Decisions https://twitter.com/realMABarreto
Cristina Tzintzun JOLT https://twitter.com/TzintzunCris

Business/entrepreneurship/general (these are just a few names but here is this list of 50 Latinas and this one of Latina Tech Founders).

Carlos Gutierrez Former Secretary of Commerce https://twitter.com/carlosgutierrez
Henry Cisneros Former HUD secretary https://twitter.com/henrygcisneros
Nina Vaca Pinnacle Group https://twitter.com/ninavaca
Jessica Rodriguez Univision Communications Inc. https://twitter.com/_RodriguezJess
Monica Lozano College Futures Foundation https://www.linkedin.com/in/monica-lozano-7524666/
Sol Trujillo Trujillo Group Investments, LLC https://www.linkedin.com/in/soltrujillo/
Pedro Pizarro Edison International https://www.linkedin.com/in/pedro-pizarro-087a5287/
Oscar Muñoz United Airlines https://www.linkedin.com/in/oscarmunozua/
Marcelo Claure CEO Softbank Group Int’l, https://twitter.com/marceloclaure
Cesar Conde NBC Telemundo https://twitter.com/cesarconde_
Geisha Williams CEO and President, PG&E http://fortune.com/2018/03/14/most-powerful-latinas-2018/
Claudia Romo Edelman Co-Host @GlobalsGoalsCast https://twitter.com/claudiagonzalez
Adriana Cisneros Cisneros https://twitter.com/cisnerosadriana
Charles Garcia ALPFA https://twitter.com/charlespgarcia
Chiqui Cartagena Hispanic marketing expert and author https://twitter.com/ChiquiCartagena
Silvina Moschini SheWorks! https://twitter.com/Miss_Internet
Ana Roca Castro Genius Plaza https://twitter.com/AnaRC

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash

How one startup is working to break the barriers that separate talent from opportunity for women

Usually I don’t dedicate a blog post to only one topic but I’ve decided to do more than one post this week and what better way to start than talking about women empowerment. Yesterday I had the privilege of joining Silvina Moschini as she unveiled the collaboration of her social impact startup SheWorks! with EY. It was a very proud moment as I’ve had a first row seat watching someone who understands and believes in the work she is doing to use technology to make an impact – as she says “breaking the barriers that separate talent from opportunity.”  Her vision, passion and commitment, coupled with the technology, are why she has been able to attract top tech companies and brands, as well as small enterprises who are being powered by SheWorks! talent. I am fortunate to be a part of the team helping to ensure that more women can pursue their professional aspirations on their own terms.

Some stats to keep in mind:

  • Every year, millions of highly qualified women opt-out of the job market due to inflexible work environments. Approximately 50% of American women with children quit their jobs due to lack of options to maintain a satisfactory work/life balance.
  • Closing the employment participation gap has the potential to create $4 trillion dollars impact in the U.S. economy alone and a global value of $17 trillion,
  • It will take until 2095 to achieve global gender parity in the workplace.

EY as founding sponsor of SheWorks! is walking the talk – in fact the announcement yesterday included a commitment to use SheWorks! to create opportunities for 100,000 women by 2020. Learn more about the announcement here. Julie Teigland, EY Regional Managing Partner—Germany, Switzerland and Austria and EY Global Leader-elect, Women. Fast forward said, “Every year, millions of professional women leave the workforce because they cannot find the flexibility they need to balance work and life. We’re excited to start this collaboration as we believe that SheWorks! is doing something exceptional in working to ensure that women and girls can increasingly benefit from the use of innovative technologies to join the workforce and they can play a role into the economic development.”

Visit www.wheresheworks.com, follow on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn and follow the conversation using #whereareyouworking #whereareyouworkingtoday #womenfastforward.

Congratulations to the amazing teams at EY and at SheWorks!.

Juneteenth, diversity in the AI sector, pregnancy discrimination, women founders, Carnival, P&G & more

Today is Juneteenth, read more about a holiday called “our country’s second independence day.”

The top recommended reads for me this week were this one from the New York Times regarding pregnancy discrimination and this piece written by Rachel Noerdlinger and titled  “Let’s bury the word ‘diversity’ and listen to communities of color before a crisis hits.”

“There’s no point having the Internet of everything if you don’t have the Internet of everyone.” Watch this great interview with Mastercard vice chairman Ann Cairns on the importance of diversity in the artificial intelligence sector.

Additional stories I am following this week include this on how to promote D&I in your office, this from Carnival Corporation’s CEO where he speaks about how diversity drives innovation, this piece from AdAge, “We are the 0.1%: why the ad world needs more female founders.” Also Inc.’s story on a new report showing gains made by black women in raising venture capital, but mainly about how much work needs to be done and this post by Isaac Mizrahi titled “Forget Relationship Breakup; Young Multiculturals Lead The Digital Breakup.” There was also this list of the best CEOs for women from CNBC. Alex Konrad points out that it is missing women CEOs, a point addressed in the story and this from CNN about P&G “The world’s biggest advertiser wants women to produce half of its ads.”

ICYMI this titled “Food Truck Serves Up Tacos to Unite Latinos And Muslims.”

Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

Pew Research on Diversity, HP, GM, Google, from diversity to equality, diversity in film critics & more

As we continue to celebrate pride month, Pamela Aquino posted this on her LinkedIn: “The next journey for the corporate world is from diversity to equality for LGBTQ employees.” 

If you missed this report from Pew Research, it is a much needed read as we hear about, and see, the divide in our country: “Most Americans express positive views of country’s growing racial and ethnic diversity.”

Here are two items from Alan Murray’s newsletter this morning, one of my daily must reads, he shared this about HPs CEO commitment to diversity. And this: Dhivya Suryadevera is GMs new CFO. Per Murray, “GM will enter rare Fortune 500 territory as one of only two companies with a female CFO and a female CEO.”

This week we had more elections and saw more women winning – so as Kelly Grace Gibson writes, “Women are running and winning in record numbers. Is DC ready?”

A USC’s Annenberg Inclusion Initiative study found that “in 2017, only 2.5% of top critics were women of color, while 80% of film critics who reviewed the year’s top box-office movies were male.” This gained some headlines, and more after Brie Larson called for more inclusivity.

Other stories this week include Google’s diversity numbers, diversity in dance music, this story titled “Amazon chasing Netflix for black content creators,” and also reading about more black women running startups.

ICYMI watch this inspiring graduation speech .

Photo by Kirsty Lee on Unsplash

Heineken USA, Starbucks, Google, diversity in tech, Variety and more

Feels like a great morning when you wake up to a Google Doodle honoring Dr. Virginia Apgar for her contributions to neonatology and to read that Heineken USA named Maggie Timoney as its CEO – which as AdAge mentions, shatters the industry’s glass ceiling. This follows the announcement earlier this week that Mellody Hobson, which as Black Enterprise points out, “is one of the most respected and knowledgeable black business leaders” will become  vice chair at Starbucks when Howard Schultz steps down at the end of the month. This is all welcomed news because there is so much work to be done.  

As you may have read, Google employees spoke up about their concerns regarding diversity. Here is this from CNN:  “Google employee confronts execs over diversity: Many of us feel ‘unsafe.” This is an important story to follow, not only about Google but about the tech industry in general. Oh and Google voted the proposal down. Read Fortune’s CEO Daily for more on this. Here is a great read on what needs to happen to drive change, as this LA Times story says, as “diversity fatigue has set in.” There are a number of programs and initiatives trying to address this issue. Thank you Silvina Moschini for sharing this titled “How this coding bootcamp is helping women land tech jobs at Reddit, Facebook and Amazon.”

On the entertainment side, you may have read that Variety’s “A Night in the Writer’s Room” event because of its lack of representation of women. Read more on his this unfolded on Twitter.  You also may have read about The MACRO Episodic Lab Powered by The Black List.

One of my favorite Twitter accounts to follow is @writersofcolor – where opportunities and diverse talent connect because as the twitter bio says “we don’t want to hear *I can’t find any* ever again, okay?”

ICYMI “12 Quotes To Motivate CMOs To Make Diversity A Priority.”

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