Juneteenth, diversity in the AI sector, pregnancy discrimination, women founders, Carnival, P&G & more

Today is Juneteenth, read more about a holiday called “our country’s second independence day.”

The top recommended reads for me this week were this one from the New York Times regarding pregnancy discrimination and this piece written by Rachel Noerdlinger and titled  “Let’s bury the word ‘diversity’ and listen to communities of color before a crisis hits.”

“There’s no point having the Internet of everything if you don’t have the Internet of everyone.” Watch this great interview with Mastercard vice chairman Ann Cairns on the importance of diversity in the artificial intelligence sector.

Additional stories I am following this week include this on how to promote D&I in your office, this from Carnival Corporation’s CEO where he speaks about how diversity drives innovation, this piece from AdAge, “We are the 0.1%: why the ad world needs more female founders.” Also Inc.’s story on a new report showing gains made by black women in raising venture capital, but mainly about how much work needs to be done and this post by Isaac Mizrahi titled “Forget Relationship Breakup; Young Multiculturals Lead The Digital Breakup.” There was also this list of the best CEOs for women from CNBC. Alex Konrad points out that it is missing women CEOs, a point addressed in the story and this from CNN about P&G “The world’s biggest advertiser wants women to produce half of its ads.”

ICYMI this titled “Food Truck Serves Up Tacos to Unite Latinos And Muslims.”

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Pew Research on Diversity, HP, GM, Google, from diversity to equality, diversity in film critics & more

As we continue to celebrate pride month, Pamela Aquino posted this on her LinkedIn: “The next journey for the corporate world is from diversity to equality for LGBTQ employees.” 

If you missed this report from Pew Research, it is a much needed read as we hear about, and see, the divide in our country: “Most Americans express positive views of country’s growing racial and ethnic diversity.”

Here are two items from Alan Murray’s newsletter this morning, one of my daily must reads, he shared this about HPs CEO commitment to diversity. And this: Dhivya Suryadevera is GMs new CFO. Per Murray, “GM will enter rare Fortune 500 territory as one of only two companies with a female CFO and a female CEO.”

This week we had more elections and saw more women winning – so as Kelly Grace Gibson writes, “Women are running and winning in record numbers. Is DC ready?”

A USC’s Annenberg Inclusion Initiative study found that “in 2017, only 2.5% of top critics were women of color, while 80% of film critics who reviewed the year’s top box-office movies were male.” This gained some headlines, and more after Brie Larson called for more inclusivity.

Other stories this week include Google’s diversity numbers, diversity in dance music, this story titled “Amazon chasing Netflix for black content creators,” and also reading about more black women running startups.

ICYMI watch this inspiring graduation speech .

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Heineken USA, Starbucks, Google, diversity in tech, Variety and more

Feels like a great morning when you wake up to a Google Doodle honoring Dr. Virginia Apgar for her contributions to neonatology and to read that Heineken USA named Maggie Timoney as its CEO – which as AdAge mentions, shatters the industry’s glass ceiling. This follows the announcement earlier this week that Mellody Hobson, which as Black Enterprise points out, “is one of the most respected and knowledgeable black business leaders” will become  vice chair at Starbucks when Howard Schultz steps down at the end of the month. This is all welcomed news because there is so much work to be done.  

As you may have read, Google employees spoke up about their concerns regarding diversity. Here is this from CNN:  “Google employee confronts execs over diversity: Many of us feel ‘unsafe.” This is an important story to follow, not only about Google but about the tech industry in general. Oh and Google voted the proposal down. Read Fortune’s CEO Daily for more on this. Here is a great read on what needs to happen to drive change, as this LA Times story says, as “diversity fatigue has set in.” There are a number of programs and initiatives trying to address this issue. Thank you Silvina Moschini for sharing this titled “How this coding bootcamp is helping women land tech jobs at Reddit, Facebook and Amazon.”

On the entertainment side, you may have read that Variety’s “A Night in the Writer’s Room” event because of its lack of representation of women. Read more on his this unfolded on Twitter.  You also may have read about The MACRO Episodic Lab Powered by The Black List.

One of my favorite Twitter accounts to follow is @writersofcolor – where opportunities and diverse talent connect because as the twitter bio says “we don’t want to hear *I can’t find any* ever again, okay?”

ICYMI “12 Quotes To Motivate CMOs To Make Diversity A Priority.”

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Puerto Rico, #WhereAreTheChildren Movement, Starbucks, Roseanne, Female CEOs & more

This past week there have been important stories that should not get lost and are focused on Puerto Rico and immigration. These two stories speak to the important role media, academia and organizations play in ensuring the voices of the voiceless are heard and why diversity is important. 

If you missed this important story, here is CBS’s coverage of the Harvard report. I share this story because David Begnaud at CBS has done an outstanding job of covering Puerto Rico since Hurricane Maria hit, here is more on his coverage. In fact, he will be honored at the Puerto Rican Day Parade because of his work – he also received The Polk award for his coverage. However, it t is important to note that many reporters have been focused on covering Puerto Rico, on the numbers given by the government and asking for updated numbers for some time, including Julio Varela and Latino Rebels as well as Puerto Rico’s Center for Investigative Journalism.

The other story that broke last week was regarding the administration’s policy on family separation and the more than 1,400 children that are unaccounted for. There are different issues here. 1) unaccompanied minors coming to the U.S., 2) the  family policy unveiled by this administration in early May and 3) there is the issue of the reports of abuse of these kids in custody. Here is this from Yahoo! that explains the different issues. These are important stories that need to continue to be covered and having diverse journalists that understand the issues will be important.

For me one area of frustration is the lack of Latinos on the Sunday talk shows – this is from 2017 but speaks to the issue…and Latinos need to be invited not only to talk about immigration. As you may recall, last week I wrote about the lack of diversity in media, here is a tweet from Astead Herndon, national politics reporter at the New York Times about why diversity is important. I don’t want to ignore when diversity gets an important platform in media. I missed the “Everyday Racism in America” discussion on MSNBC but hope to watch it later this week. Here’s a link.  Note this is a link from twitter which shows more than 950K viewers on the platform, I wonder what the TV ratings will be?

On Tuesday afternoon Starbucks closed its stores for the diversity training. The WSJ focused on how this potentially helped competitors, while other media like USA Today focused on the training itself. Here is this good piece from the Dallas Morning News, where they invited companies recognized for diversity to talk about their D&I efforts. Unfortunately the story dominating the news yesterday was Roseanne being canceled because of a racist tweet. I am not sure anyone was surprised by her tweet. The surprise was the swift action by ABC, Viacom’s channels and Hulu as they canceled and/or pulled the show.

Other stories from this week, Snapchat’s diversity, this titled “What’s Behind the Decline in Female CEOs,” Revlon naming its first woman CEO and Law.com’s Diversity Scorecard.

Congratulations to the amazing Girl Scouts CEO Sylvia Acevedo, she was named one of Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People in Business – and I could not agree more!

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World Day for Cultural Diversity, Election Night, Magdalena Skipper, Barbara Underwood, Stacey Cunningham & more

This past Monday marked the UN’s World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development. Michelin released its first diversity and inclusion report for North America that day. The ICC posted this and I found this focused on media and this and this focused on the medical field. I didn’t find too many stories or announcements tied to this day in the U.S. but hope next year we can see a stronger U.S. focused movement to celebrate cultural diversity.

Listen here to The Takeaway on the new report on diversity in U.S. newsrooms. Representation is important, especially in media. A must listen. Look at these charts on political reporters from 2016 elections. As a reminder, here is the New York Times report and here is the Los Angeles Times pay gap report. So as newsrooms plan for this election and for 2020, here are Tanzina’s tips for making newsrooms more inclusive.

Last night was a big night for women running for office: Stacey Abrams became the Democratic nomination for Governor of Georgia, former Sheriff Lupe Valdez won the Democratic nomination for Governor of Texas, Amy McGrath won the Democratic House primary in Kentucky, Gina Ortiz Jones won a runoff in Texas. On the Republican side Vickie Glisson won the GOP nomination for Kentucky’s third congressional district and  Angela Leet won the Republican primary for Louisville mayor. Read more here on yesterday’s elections.

Congratulations to Magdalena Skipper, the first woman editor in chief of Nature Magazine in its “nearly” 150-year history. Here is an interview she did for NPR’s  Lulu Garcia-Navarro. Congratulations to Barbara Underwood who “became the first woman to serve as attorney general in New York after she was appointed to the role in a joint legislative session Tuesday.” Read more here. Also, congratulations to Stacey Cunningham, NYSE’s first female president. Here she talks about the gender diversity problem.

Most of us watched part of, or all, of the Royal Wedding and read about the celebration of black culture we experienced. I had a hard time deciding which story to include about the events this past weekend, but recommend reading “What the presence of Black culture at the royal wedding meant to me.” Oh and yes I’ve now downloaded Sheku Kanneh-Mason’s music and subscribed to his YouTube channel.

ICYMI every week I like to highlight reporters that you should be following. Monica Castillo from The Lily is one I’ve mentioned, here is an April post she did titled “How Figure Skating in Harlem helps black and Latina girls build their confidence.” 

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Allure’s May issue, Dallas Morning News “Questions of Color” series, Sexist AI Bots, new Girl Scouts PSA and More

Let me start with a quick reminder that May is Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. Allure’s cover this month features “three game-changing Asian models.” Editor in Chief Michelle Lee  talks about the importance of this issue here. Michelle is someone I follow closely because as Rebecca Sun says “She is why representation matters not just on the covers but on the mastheads as well. Happy #APAHM!!”

A few years ago I had the pleasure of meeting a sharp reporter who had graduated from my alma mater and was interning at the Wall Street Journal, Cassandra Jaramillo. She is now working at the Dallas Morning News and I’ve included her coverage here before. In other words, you too should you follow her. Here is her most recent work that is part of  the publication’s series “Questions of Color” and titled How Texas couples navigate race, culture — and resistance.”

I’ll be writing more on AI at a later time but this from Robert LoCascio titled “Thousands of Sexist AI Bots Could Be Coming. Here’s How We Can Stop Them,” is an important read. As he reminds us “The AI of today was developed by predominantly white male engineers in too much of a hurry to challenge their own chauvinism or consider the harm their work could do.”

This week I am following Amazon’s commitment to increasing board diversity, also this from BlackRock’s Diversity Chief  Jonathan McBride and this on Nike’s new diversity initiative  On the board diversity point, here is this great piece from the Harvard Business Review.

ICYMI Queen Latifah narrates Girl Scouts’ new star-studded leadership PSA, watch it here.

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Ageism, Diversity in Tech, James Beard Awards, American Identity & more

One topic I’ve wanted to focus on is ageism and when I read this from Cindy Gallop titled “We need to make ageism in the workplace old news” I decided this was the week. After reading it I did a quick Google search and found several good reads, including this titled “Ageism is becoming a major issue for corporation” and this one “Too young to have an opinion, too old to innovate: lifting the lid on ageism in advertising.” There is this about boardroom diversity and several stories like this one about how Madonna is fighting ageism. 

Everyone agrees that diversity in tech continues to be an issue, which is why the Congressional Black Caucus recently visited Silicon Valley to meet with tech companies. Here are some recommended reads resulting from that recent visit: “Tech’s Race Problem Beyond the Number” and “Diversity in Silicon Valley? Not Much Has Changed.”

Tanzina Vega is the new host of The Takeaway. Listen to this from this week “‘Out of Many, One.’ But Do We Have One American Identity?” 

Here are other stories I have been following this week, “Black and Brown Podcasters Are Creating an Audio World You Won’t Find in The Mainstream,” diversity at the James Beard Awards and this titled “How a Wave of Honest History Museums Is Changing Black Tourism.”  This past weekend The United States of Women 2018 Summit took place, read more here.

ICYMI, the New York Times pulled together eight things to read about Childish Gambino’s ‘This Is America’ music video.

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